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Concept photograph of artists from the Campfire Group seated at the boardroom table of the Queensland Art Gallery

2005.0058.0001.013

Concept photograph of artists from the Campfire Group seated at the boardroom table of the Queensland Art Gallery

Object information

Physical description

A black and white concept photograph of nine members of the Campfire Group of artists seated around the oval boardroom table of the Queensland Art Gallery. All are wearing pairs of sunglasses decorated with white paint and looking out of the picture plane towards the viewer. A standing man in the background waits on them.

Statement of significance

The installation work All Stock Must Go is an assemblage of body parts from an old Dodge truck painted with significant Aboriginal designs. It comprises a truck cab, a bonnet, a fuel tank, tray back, side mirror, 4 wooden human figure cut outs, 2 contextual photographs, decorated goggles, a CD and Video documentaries and lid support for the monitor. This work was created in 1996 in Brisbane by the Campfire Group (primarily a collective of urban Indigenous artists) for inclusion in the 1996 Asia-Pacific Triennial held in Brisbane.

This installation is a symbolic visual statement by a collective of Indigenous people about urban culture and related socio-political issues. The use of the truck references the history of the removal of Aboriginal people from ancestral lands to depots of assimilation such as missions. Parallels are drawn with the use of cattle trucks for the herding of cattle. The title is a play on words which simultaneously refers to the commodification of culture at sale prices - thus "all stock must go" - and the further devaluation of urban and tribal artefacts by selling art from 'the back of a truck', both of which highlight the use of Indigenous designs through the tourist trade. Issues of cultural loss, self determination and cultural reclamation were addressed in various ways including the re-purposing of the truck which led to it being dismantled. Truck parts were re-possessed or re-appropriated through the application of traditional markings.

Object information

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