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Chair made by Albert MacKenzie for president of Presbyterian Women's Missionary Union, 1913

2010.0009.0001

Chair made by Albert MacKenzie for president of Presbyterian Women's Missionary Union, 1913

Object information

Description

A plaque with the following inscription is on the back rest of the chair:

P.W.M.U. President's Chair
This chair was made by an Aboriginal boy - ALBERT MACKENZIE aged 15 years at WEIPA MISSION STATION and presented at the Missionary Offering Service in St Andrews Church on the 6th Aug 1913.
(No nails used in putting the chair together).

Physical description

A dark brown wooden chair with a presentation plaque fixed to upper back. Engraved text on plaque reads: 'P.W.M.U. PRESIDENT'S CHAIR / THIS CHAIR WAS MADE BY AN ABORIGINAL BOY / - ALBERT MACKENZIE AGED 15 YEARS AT WEIPA / MISSION STATION AND PRESENTED AT THE MISSIONARY / OFFERING SERVICE IN ST ANDREWS CHURCH ON THE 6TH AUG 1913. / (NO NAILS USED IN PUTTING THE CHAIR TOGETHER)'.

Statement of significance

The Presbyterian Women's Missionary Union of Qld Collection no.2 consists of a hand-made wooden chair. The chair was originally made with no nails.

The chair was made in 1913 by a 15 year old Aboriginal boy, Albert Mackenzie from Weipa mission station. It was presented to the President of the PWMU as thanks for the substantial funds raised for the mission station and the Christmas boxes with clothes, books and food which they sent every year. Aboriginal boys on mission stations were taught skills such as woodwork and trained to work in the cattle industry. The chair was exhibited at the Brisbane Exhibition in 1913 as an example of how the missions were training Aboriginal people to be productive and industrious.

Object information

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