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National Museum of Australia

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Black Devereux Bowly clock, brought to Australia by the Blaxland family in the early 1800's.

2009.0011.0001

Black Devereux Bowly clock, brought to Australia by the Blaxland family in the early 1800's.

Object information

Physical description

A black slate pendulum clock with two carved figures on either side of the clock face. The clock features a fusee chain driven movement with an engraved brass back plate. Covering the face of the clock is a bevelled glass door with a brass border. The clock has a black slate casing and is carved on the front to reveal gold scrolls. Engraved on a medallion on the front of the clock is "Devereux / Bowly / London / 1718". The clock strikes on the half and full hour and has a brass key and a silver metal key for winding.

Statement of significance

The Daryl Blaxland collection comprises a black slate mantel clock with architectural case which belonged to pioneer John Blaxland (1769-1845), a mortise gauge associated with the family and a copy of Gregory Blaxland's Journal published in 1913. The pendulum clock features a fusee chain driven movement with an engraved brass back plate. The heavy slate casing has two carved figures on either side of the clock face. Engraved on the front of the clock is "Devereux / Bowly / London / 1718".

John Blaxland was a captain in the Duke of York's Cavalry until he resigned to manage the family estates at Newington, Kent, in England. John and his brother Gregory came to New South Wales possibly on the recommendation of their friend Sir Joseph Banks. They were promised many 'indulgences' in the colony including land, free passages and convicts. Gregory arrived with his family in 1806. John stayed to sell their English estates and arrived on 3 April 1807. He had agreed to invest £6000 in the colony and arrived with his wife and children, household staff, supplies and equipment. The brothers shared close business interests in the colony but were considered difficult men by successive governors. John and Gregory Blaxland both contributed significantly to the life of colony. They encouraged the cattle industry and produced some of the earliest wine in the colony (possibly the first wine). John Blaxland was an early supporter of trial by jury in the colony.

The clock and the mortise gauge in the Daryl Blaxland collection give an insight into the decorative and useful objects belonging to a wealthy pioneer. The journal documents the family's continuing pride in Gregory Blaxland's discovery.

Object information

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