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National Museum of Australia

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Wooden case used to store photographic plates photographed by Richard Daintree in Queensland in the 1860s

2007.0100.0001.011

Wooden case used to store photographic plates photographed by Richard Daintree in Queensland in the 1860s

Object information

Physical description

A dovetailed wooden case with a hand-forged ferrous metal handle on the top of its rear-hinged lid. A metal hook-and-eye catch is fitted to the front. A grooved wooden panel is attached to the inside of the front and back to accommodate photographic glass plates. The base is a masonite panel.

Statement of significance

The Richard Daintree collection consists of 10 glass plate positives in a wooden travel case made in the 1870s. The glass plate positives are copies of glass plate negatives, produced through wet plate photography. The photographs were taken by Richard Daintree in north Queensland in the 1860s of gold miners at home and at work; a bullock team and dray; and a large group of Aboriginal or Islander people at a mission station.

Richard Daintree (1832-78) was born in Cambridgeshire and joined the gold rush to Victoria in 1852. Unsuccessful as a prospector, he became a geological surveyor and a skilled photographer. In the 1860s he was one of the earliest European settlers in north Queensland. He conducted geological surveys and discovered gold that lead to the first gold rushes in north Queensland. As a photographer, he made the only known images of these first remote gold fields in the north. They were used internationally by the colony to promote immigration and investment.

Object information

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