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National Museum of Australia

Collection Explorer

4

Collections

  • Myrtle Wilson collection(87)

    Certificate awarded at the Yarram Agricultural Society 78th Annual Show, 1960 for first prize for a jug cover
    Certificate
    Certificate awarded to Mrs V.M. Wilson at the Wynard Agricultural and Pastoral Society Annual Show, 1968 for first prize for a tapestry bag
    Second prize awarded for 'Round Rose Tablecloth' at Euroa Agricultural & Pastoral Society 78th Annual Show
  • Papunya Art 2008 collection(15)

    Pencil drawing in Papunya style by Uta Uta Tjangala, Pintupi, 1971
    Untitled painting by Anatjari Tjakamarra, 1972, polymer on board
    Pencil and watercolour, on paper in Papunya style by unknown Pintupi artist, 1971
    Pencil and watercolour, on paper in Papunya style by unknown Pintupi artist, 1971

    The Papunya Art 2008 Collection consists of fifteen artworks, comprising eleven untitled watercolours and drawings on paper produced by Pintupi artists in 1971, 'Goanna Corroboree at Mirkantji' painted on plywood by Kaapa Tjampitjinpa in 1971, 'Snake Dreaming for Children' painted on particle board by Uta Uta Tjangala in 1971, an untitled work painted on wooden board by Anatjari Tjakamarra in 1972, and an untitled work on linen by Uta Uta Tjangala painted in 1986. It also includes some supporting documentation held in the Archive collection.

    The works in this collection are all significant Indigenous works, representing different stages and some of the major artists involved in the development of the Western Desert art movement at Papunya, which has become internationally renowned as the origin of the contemporary Aboriginal acrylic painting industry. The fourteen works from 1971 and 1972 represent the very earliest phase of the movement at Papunya. The eleven watercolours and drawings on paper , three attributed to Uta Uta Tjangala, represent a formative moment in this movement when artists began experimenting with different media.The sketching of designs on paper took place prior to the production of acrylic paintings. Although the designs themselves had been produced traditionally by the artists as body decoration, ground and cave paintings, when Papunya school teacher Geoffrey Bardon supplied the Pintupi men with paper, watercolour and pencil, this was the first time their designs had been applied to a non-traditional surface. Kaapa Tjampitjinpa, Uta Uta Tjangala and Anatjari Tjakamarra were all important artists who contributed to the birth and subsequent development of the Papunya painting movement. The three paintings on boards in this collection, done during 1971 and 1972, therefore enhance the Museum's holdings of significant works from this early period. The 1986 Uta Uta Tjangala painting is also a significant addition to the NMA's growing holdings of this important artist. Overall, the items in this collection are significant in expanding the chronological sweep of the NMA's holdings of Papunya related material, beyond its current strengths in the 1974-1981 period.

  • Josef Lebovic Gallery collection no. 1(7553)

    Yatching, Sydney Harbour
    Muster of Coolies, Monerakande Estate, Ceylon - Lipton series
    Maurice Dry Cleaners vans, with the Sydney Harbour Bridge
    P.J. McGann's Phegans' Estate, Woy Woy
  • Chai Vang and Por Ye collection(12)

    Hook blade brush knife
    Knife with bullock horn handle
    Wooden arrow with cardboard fletching or fin
    Wooden arrow with cardboard fletching or fin

    The collection consists of one dibble (or digging stick), four cardboard signs, two knives, the head of a small hoe, a cross-bow and arrows used by Chai Vang and Por Ye, Hmong market gardeners in Tasmania. The metal objects were made in Thailand by Chai Vang's father, a traditional Hmong blacksmith, and the wooden items and cardboard signs were made by Chai in Hobart.

    Chai Vang and Por Ye arrived in Australia with their eight children as refugees from Laos in 1991. The family settled in Hobart, Tasmania within the small Hmong community that had established itself during the 1970s. In 2000 the family began to farm on several acres of land near Hobart and sell their produce at the Salamanca Markets. The Hmong market gardeners have become an important part of Tasmania's social, cultural and agricultural scene through their involvement with the Salamanca Markets and their willingness to share aspects of their traditional culture with the wider community.

  • Ellen Rogers collection(15)

    Silver plated metal and horse-hair hair brush
    Souvenir half main bearing of the Central Engine from the Southern Cross used on Pacific, Australian, Tasman and English flights 1928-1929
    Silver plated metal and horse-hair hair brush
    Dressing case containing two hair brushes, two clothes brushes, a comb and a mirror

    The Ellen Rogers collection consists of fifteen items of memorabilia associated with Australian aviation pioneers, Sir Charles Kingsford Smith and Charles Ulm. The collection consist of a half-size bronze life-mask of Sir Charles Kingsford-Smith; full-size bronze life-mask of Charles Ulm; propeller hub of an Australian National Airways Ltd (ANA) Avro X Lynx engine; half-main bearing removed from the central engine of the 'Southern Cross' aircraft after the 1928 trans-Pacific flight; Charles Ulm's attaché case; framed composite photograph with dedication; black and white photograph of 'Faith in Australia'; commemorative wall clock mounted in a propeller; and a velvet covered timber dressing case containing silver plated brushes, comb and mirror. The objects in this collection, many of them presented as gifts to Rogers, reflect the respect and affection Kingsford Smith and Ulm held for their secretary whom they referred to as 'Rog'.

    In 1928, Charles Kingsford Smith and Charles Ulm became the first aviators to cross the Pacific Ocean by air in the 'Southern Cross'. With two American crewmembers, they took off from Oakland, California, on 31 May 1928 and flew via Hawaii and Suva to Brisbane, completing the historic 11,585 kilometre crossing in 83 hours, 38 minutes, of flying time. Kingsford Smith and Ulm were awarded the Air Force Cross and given honorary commissions in the Royal Australian Air Force. In December 1928, they founded Australian National Airways Ltd (ANA) as a passenger, mail and freight service between cities and towns in eastern Australia. Mounting financial difficulties forced ANA to suspend all passenger services in June 1931, and the company entered voluntary liquidation in February 1933. The two aviators died tragically while pursing their interests - Ulm disappearing in December 1934 flying between California and Hawaii, and Kingsford Smith lost without trace in 1935 off the coast of Burma. Ellen Rogers was employed as secretary to Kingsford Smith and Ulm following the trans-Pacific flight, during the establishment and operation of ANA, and continued working as private secretary to Charles Ulm until his death.

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs Art (ATSIAA) collection(2104)

    A tea set with ATSIC logos
    Portrait of David Unaipon by Lyell Dolan
    Sugarbag Dreaming by Jimmy Wululu
    Landscape with grass tree

    The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs Art collection comprises 2050 artworks and other objects. The artworks - which numerically dominate the collection - were produced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities throughout Australia. The accumulation of these artworks into a single collection has resulted from the choices and selections made during a 38 year period by a variety of staff working for the Council for Aboriginal Affairs (CAA), the Department of Aboriginal Affairs (DAA), the Aboriginal Development Commission (ADC) and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (ATSIC) at the national, regional and local levels.

    The collection spans the years following the 1967 referendum, when dramatic changes in the governance of Aboriginal people took place, up to 2005 when the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission was dissolved. It provides a snapshot of the diversity and changes in Indigenous art and its representation which occurred during the period of its formation. The small number of 'non-art' objects in the collection is also significant in providing insights into the working of the various Commonwealth bodies involved in Indigenous affairs. As well as the significance of many of the individual pieces, the collection is also significant as a whole, as a complex artefact stemming from Australia's history of governance of Australian Indigenous peoples.

  • Timothy Millett collection(314)

    Convict love token from William Pritchard, 1830
    Convict love token from Fredrick Bloodswort, 1840
    Convict love token from F. Buck, 1830
    Convict love token from W. James, 1826

    The Timothy Millett collection comprises 307 convict love tokens dating from 1762 to 1856, and seven contemporary documents relating to the criminal justice system including: recommendations to commute the death sentences of Hester Sampson and Thomas Hayes to life transportation; a calendar of prisoners awaiting trial in the goals of Durham, Newcastle and Northumberland; a request to the Middlesex assizes for rewards to be paid; a printed copy of George Skene's last speech prior to execution; a printed broadside listing prisoners in Dorchester jail awaiting transportation; and a 60 page handwritten account of the life of Thomas Jones, who was transported twice and finally hanged at Winchester Prison in 1856.

    Convict love tokens, typically made from smoothed-down coins and engraved or stippled with a message, derive from traditional sailors' farewells. The production of these 'leaden hearts' rose as criminal indictments increased in Britain, with the majority produced during the 1820s and 1830s. As mementos made by or for convicts facing transportation (or death) to leave behind for their loved ones, the tokens provide a poignant, personal insight into the transportation system.

  • Alex and Paddy Stitt collection(14)

    Life. Be in it. Exercisements
    Life. Be in it comic strip featuring Norm, 902
    Life. Be in it poster: Every little bit helps!
    Life. Be in it poster: Every little bit helps!

    The Alex and Stitt collection comprises a number of objects relating to the Life. Be In It public health campaign of the late 1970s and 1980s. In the collection are one T-shirt bearing the Life. Be In It logo, worn by Alex Stitt, the animator of the original Life. Be In It campaign, T-shirt bearing the Life. Be In It logo, produced in association with World Cricket series, three original Norm comic strips, drawn by Alex Stitt, seven Life. Be In It posters promoting exercise and a healthy life, one Life. Be In It book describing games to play, one Life. Be In It book titled 'Walkies' detailing walks in Victoria where pets can be taken.

    The Life. Be In It public health campaign was initiated by the Victorian state government in 1975 and then taken up by the Federal government in 1978 and introduced throughout Australia. Life. Be In It aimed to educate the Australian public about exercise in a fun and non-threatening manner, making it part of everyday routine. The campaign was developed by the advertising group Monahan Dayman Adams and promoted through community announcements on television, cartoons in newspapers and also through community groups. Life. Be In It achieved a 94% recognition rate in 1984 and represents and important collaboration between government an advertising in creating awareness about the importance of public health.

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