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National Museum of Australia

Collection Explorer

4

Collections

  • Diana Baxter collection no. 1(4)

    Pearl necklace given to Janet Templeton in Edinburgh by her husband on their wedding anniversary in 1826
    Pearl brooch given to Janet Templeton in Edinburgh by her husband on their wedding anniversary in 1826
    Pearl brooch given to Janet Templeton in Edinburgh by her husband on their wedding anniversary in 1826
    Pearl brooch given to Janet Templeton in Edinburgh by her husband on their wedding anniversary in 1826
  • Dorothy Bennett collection(167)

    Muraina's Quarrel with Gandji, the Jabilai Man and Wurrban, the Emu Woman.
    Bardurru, the Hollow Mortuary Log is borne to the Milky Way or The Pussycat and the Crows.
    Totemic creatures.
    Wooden decorated carving of a snake by Nangunyarri I
  • Governor Davey's Proclamation to the Aborigines 1816 collection(1)

    Drawing depicting Governor Davey's Proclamation to the Aborigines 1816

    The object is a calendered fabric poster, dating from 1866 or 1867, titled Governor Davey's Proclamation to the Aborigines, 1816. The hand coloured lithograph is based on the original oil-painted wooden boards designed by George Frankland in 1829, under the authority of Lieutenant-Governor George Arthur. The poster, one of a series, was presented as a curiosity and used as an advertisement for the newly born colony of Tasmania.

    The original boards, on which the lithograph is modelled, were issued during the administration of Governor Arthur and designed by George Frankland in 1829, as part of the so-called 'Black War' when hostility between Tasmania's Indigenous population and colonists escalated. The lithograph posters were initially printed in a run of 500 for the 1866 Melbourne International Exhibition. They were produced by the office of the Surveyor-General in Tasmania and distributed as a souvenir to attract visitors to the Tasmanian stall. A second print run is thought to have been made as the lithographs were also used at the 1867 Paris Universal Exhibition. The lithograph posters were incorrectly titled 'Governor Davey's Proclamation to the Aborigines, 1815'.

  • Josef Lebovic Gallery collection no. 1(7553)

    Postcard featuring a verse titled
    On Brown's River Road, Tasmania
    Milson's Point horse ferry, Sydney Harbour
    To Greet You.  A timber cutters camp
  • Warakurna History Paintings collection(33)

    Land Rights by Eunice Yunurupa Porter
    Warakurna Community by Tracy Yates
    Walking Man by Eunice Yunurupa Porter
    Camel Lady by Jean Burke

    This collection consists of thirty-three paintings produced by Warakurna Artists for a collaborative commercial exhibition with the Outstation Gallery in Darwin. The exhibition, 'History Paintings - All the Stories got into our minds and eyes', opened in May 2011.

    The collection is significant as a broad and comprehensive body of work that presents a series of (related) Aboriginal perspectives on events in Australian history, some of which fundamentally challenge other accounts in the historical record. The collection documents the historical perspective of Ngaanyatjarra people who currently reside in the community of Warakurna. Contextualised by more customary mythic narratives, most of the works address historical events and provide an insight into the Aboriginal experience of contact on the colonial frontier. Taken together, from the Seven Sisters Dreaming to football carnivals in Warakurna today, the collection encompasses 100 years (and more) of history in the Ngaanyatjarra lands.

  • National Sports Information Centre collection(37)

    Black and white photograph of two women swimmers at Tooowoomba, Queensland, 1911
    Black and white photograph of US swimmer Duke Kahanamoku of Honolulu
    Autographed photograph of US swimmer Ethelda Bleibtrey, Toowoomba, Queensland
    Black and white photograph of US swimmer Charlotte Boyle, 1921
  • Convict Love Token collection no. 2(4)

    Convict love token 1792
    Convict love token
    Convict love token from Samuel Smith, 1839
    Convict love token 1844

    This collection consists of 4 Convict Love Tokens: one copper halfpenny engraved with MC/1792; one cartwheel penny engraved with squire with rifle and dog; one copper penny engraved with a sailor in front of a sailing ship; and one shaved down penny with 'L.B/L.W/1844'.

    Convict love tokens, typically made of smoothed down coins and engraved or stippled with a message, provide a poignant, personal insight into the transportation system, as well as its transnational character. Also known as 'leaden hearts', the tokens stem from traditional sailors' farewells. Convict tokens were made for the whole of the Transportation period in New South Wales and Tasmania, with the majority produced during the 1820s and 1830s. As objects purposely made by or for convicts to give as mementoes, to be left behind when the prisoner was transported, the tokens are a unique part of the record of a convict's transportation experience.

  • Timothy Millett collection(314)

    Convict love token from William Holland
    Convict love token from John, 1836
    Convict love token captioned I love till death shall stop my breath, 1802
    Convict love token from W. Griffiths, 1825

    The Timothy Millett collection comprises 307 convict love tokens dating from 1762 to 1856, and seven contemporary documents relating to the criminal justice system including: recommendations to commute the death sentences of Hester Sampson and Thomas Hayes to life transportation; a calendar of prisoners awaiting trial in the goals of Durham, Newcastle and Northumberland; a request to the Middlesex assizes for rewards to be paid; a printed copy of George Skene's last speech prior to execution; a printed broadside listing prisoners in Dorchester jail awaiting transportation; and a 60 page handwritten account of the life of Thomas Jones, who was transported twice and finally hanged at Winchester Prison in 1856.

    Convict love tokens, typically made from smoothed-down coins and engraved or stippled with a message, derive from traditional sailors' farewells. The production of these 'leaden hearts' rose as criminal indictments increased in Britain, with the majority produced during the 1820s and 1830s. As mementos made by or for convicts facing transportation (or death) to leave behind for their loved ones, the tokens provide a poignant, personal insight into the transportation system.

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