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National Museum of Australia

Where our stories come alive

Collection Explorer

4

Collections

  • Dr Helen M Wurm collection no. 6(44)

    Snake Jiningbirna.
    Shark.
    Sawfish
    Barawind.
  • J Davidson collection no. 3(319)

    Bark painting depicting a Nyapililngu digging stick by Narritjin Maymuru, Yirrkala, 1967
    Bark painting depicting a male human figure with outstretched hands by David Malangi, Milingimbi, 1965
    Djunkgawul.
    Bark painting depicting Macassans boiling down trepang by Mathaman Marika, Yirrkala, 1964
  • Canning Stock Route collection(125)

    'Mustering' by Veronia Lulu, 2007
    'Tapu' by Wakartu Cory Surprise, 2007
    Fibre basket by Dadda Samson, 2008
    Fibre basket by Thelma Judson, 2008

    The Canning Stock Route collection is comprised of 125 works and includes paintings, drawings, baskets, boomerangs, coolamons, headdresses, carved figures and shields.

    The Canning Stock Route is a no-longer-used cattle droving route that traverses the Great Sandy and Gibson Deserts of central Western Australia. Comprised of 48 wells along an 1800 kilometres stretch of track, the route links Wiluna in the south with Sturt Creek in the north and traverses the traditional lands of nine Aboriginal language groups. The route was founded in 1905 when Alfred Canning was commissioned to investigate a route suitable for the droving of 500 head of cattle, with water sources spaced at intervals of no more than one day's walk apart. Although Canning's map records observations of the land and water resources, it makes no mention of Indigenous places and their associated meanings which the route traversed. This collection, composed of 'painting stories', sculptural works and oral histories, re-dresses Canning's omission and records the impact of the stock route on Indigenous lives and country. A six week journey with traditional owners held in July and August of 2007 inspired the artworks, many of which were produced during the journey, and provided an opportunity for more than 70 senior and emerging artists to reconnect with traditional lands..

  • Springfield - Faithfull Family collection(3501)

    Mortar-board hat
    Miss Carell's Grave
    Black and white photograph of Hope, Lilian and Clare Faithfull

    The Springfield Collection comprises about 1550 artefacts from Springfield station, south of Goulburn. It includes colonial era costume, a bushranger medal, surveying instruments, a late-19th century landau, firearms and edged weapons, wool samples and Joseph Foveaux's pocket watch and bible. The objects are complemented by over 400 photographs. This diverse collection reflects the growth and economic success of the property, responses to changes in the wool market and the daily lives of the people who have lived on Springfield.

    Springfield has grown from a 518-hectare land grant given to William Pitt Faithfull in 1828 to the current 3183 hectares with ownership remaining in the one family. William Pitt Faithfull established the Springfield Merino Stud in 1838 with ten rams selected from the Macarthur Camden Park stud. The stud evolved slowly over the years until the early 1950s when, under the management of Jim Maple-Brown, a scientific approach to wool-growing was adopted and the stud's name was changed to Fonthill to reflect this.

  • David Crane and Alice Sutton collection no. 2(13)

    Bark roofing slab 1
    Fence strainer
    Broadcast seeder
    Silage/hay cutter
  • Josef Lebovic Gallery collection no. 1(7551)

    A peep thro' the bushes, Blue Lake, Mt Gambier, SA
    Souvenir of Grand Opening New Drummoyne Theatre
    Guthega Power Station
    Dungog, NSW
  • William and Jeanette Derham Family - Bendigo Pottery collection(418)

    Ceramic hot water bottle with screw cap
    Canoe shaped ceramic vase
    Glazed brown ceramic demijohn with screw-threaded stopper [Mt Lyell M&R Co Ltd, Port Adelaide]
    Water Filter with lid and tap

    The William and Jeanette Derham family collection is the physical manifestation of Mr Derham's commitment to documenting the work of Bendigo Pottery, its wares and institutional history, as well as the association he and his family had with the business between 1968 and 1983. The collection consists of historic Bendigo Pottery ceramics from the 19th and 20th centuries which illustrate the diversity of wares produced between 1858 and 1971, as well as a comprehensive range of items manufactured during the Derham era. This material is supported by a unique collection of stamps and printing blocks used as part of the manufacturing and advertising processes as well as documentary materials, photographs and ephemera which illustrate working life at Bendigo Pottery.

    Since its establishment in 1858, Bendigo Pottery has played a significant role in the history of Australian ceramics, producing wares ranging from the domestic and decorative, to the utilitarian and industrial. The history of the business illustrates the process of technological transfer in the decorative arts, the adaptation of imported ceramic traditions to local markets and the development of distinctively Australian imagery, styles and pottery products. Bendigo Pottery has provided useful products and employment opportunities to the community for 150 years and on an aesthetic level ensured that the skills of the potter, which so easily could have been lost with the advent of mass production techniques, have been preserved for posterity.

  • Woodleigh Shorthorn Stud collection(85)

    Certificate
    Certificate
    Certificate
    Certificate

    The Woodleigh Shorthorn Stud Collection is an extensive collection of trophies, ribbons, medals, badges, prize certificates, showing equipment and stud cattle photographs. The items are associated with a beef shorthorn stud established by the Davis family of the Corowa district in the early 1950s, and are in good condition.

    These objects record a recent expression of a long tradition of showing stud livestock at agricultural shows in Australia and Britain. Stud competitions at annual shows in Australian cities and regional centres enabled the gradual improvement of sheep and cattle herds. Shorthorn cattle proved adaptable and hardy in Australia, and became one of the dominant breeds. The Woodleigh Shorthorn Stud Collection helps to record the successful establishment of the shorthorn breed in Australia and the role of agricultural shows in enabling the improvement of cattle breeds. The collection also reflects the dramatic changes experienced by the rural sector in the second half of the twentieth century as tightening economic conditions forced many rural families, including the Davis family, to sell their properties.

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