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National Museum of Australia

Collection Explorer

4

Collections

  • Springfield - Faithfull Family collection(3501)

    Clare Wilkinson (nee Faithfull) sitting on a wall, wearing a long white dress and very large hat
    Length of string used to tie around dance cards
    Envelope addressed to Miss Lilian Faithfull, Springfield, Goulburn
    Extract from Mr Charles Matcham's letters to a relative in England 1834

    The Springfield Collection comprises about 1550 artefacts from Springfield station, south of Goulburn. It includes colonial era costume, a bushranger medal, surveying instruments, a late-19th century landau, firearms and edged weapons, wool samples and Joseph Foveaux's pocket watch and bible. The objects are complemented by over 400 photographs. This diverse collection reflects the growth and economic success of the property, responses to changes in the wool market and the daily lives of the people who have lived on Springfield.

    Springfield has grown from a 518-hectare land grant given to William Pitt Faithfull in 1828 to the current 3183 hectares with ownership remaining in the one family. William Pitt Faithfull established the Springfield Merino Stud in 1838 with ten rams selected from the Macarthur Camden Park stud. The stud evolved slowly over the years until the early 1950s when, under the management of Jim Maple-Brown, a scientific approach to wool-growing was adopted and the stud's name was changed to Fonthill to reflect this.

  • Workshop Arts Centre collection no. 2(5)

    Artwork titled

    Poster for Aboriginal week September '85'

    Lost Heritage

    Bunya Mountains

  • Josef Lebovic Gallery collection no. 1(7553)

    Wick Post Office Staff, 1914
    The Hyde Park Barracks, Sydney
    S.S. Wyreema
    Post Office, Mansfield, Vic
  • Chai Vang and Por Ye collection(12)

    Hook blade brush knife
    Hoe blade
    Wooden crossbow with bark string
    Long wooden dibble

    The collection consists of one dibble (or digging stick), four cardboard signs, two knives, the head of a small hoe, a cross-bow and arrows used by Chai Vang and Por Ye, Hmong market gardeners in Tasmania. The metal objects were made in Thailand by Chai Vang's father, a traditional Hmong blacksmith, and the wooden items and cardboard signs were made by Chai in Hobart.

    Chai Vang and Por Ye arrived in Australia with their eight children as refugees from Laos in 1991. The family settled in Hobart, Tasmania within the small Hmong community that had established itself during the 1970s. In 2000 the family began to farm on several acres of land near Hobart and sell their produce at the Salamanca Markets. The Hmong market gardeners have become an important part of Tasmania's social, cultural and agricultural scene through their involvement with the Salamanca Markets and their willingness to share aspects of their traditional culture with the wider community.

  • Anne Stockton collection no. 1(1158)

    Purchase slip from Takeda Bros. and Co., 1931
    Telegram to Mr Aumuller Kamo Maru, Thursday Island
    LCO Aumuller Powhattan Hankow. Home Sick Nankin Love Innes
    LCO Aumuller Powhattan, Hankow Received letter decided return Hankow, November First, Innes
  • Nettie McColive collection(189)

    Certificate
    Certificate
    Certificate
    Certificate

    Needlework has been an important creative outlet for women throughout Australian history. This work has often been denigrated due to the (gendered) divide between high and low culture which regards domestic work as trivial, feminine and unworthy of the title "Art". A reassessment of history informed by womens' history and feminism has led to domestic needlework being acknowledged as more than simply functional labour. The social role of this type of work is now better appreciated making it a vital aspect of domestic material culture.

    This collection consists of objects relating to the life of Minetta (Nettie) McColive (nee Huppatz). Mrs McColive's quilts form the centre piece of the collection. Three of these were made in the 1930's, the Farm Life Quilt, Wildflowers Quilt and the International Quilt. Also featured in the collection are certificates, photographs and d'oyleys. This collection helps to document issues such as women in rural Australia, quilting and needlework, education in the outback, community or commemorative quilting, shows and competitions.

    Mrs McColive's work has been the subject of considerable interest both in South Australia as well as in the general quilting community. Her work is featured in two books, Jennifer Isaac's The Gentle Arts and Margaret Rolfe's Patchwork Quilts in Australia. Her work has also featured in exhibitions such as the Quilt Australia '88 exhibition as well as an exhibition held in Prospect showcasing the work of local artists.

  • Dr Helen M Wurm collection no. 6(44)

    Sawfish
    Marakolo Dreaming.
    Eagle.
    Stingray.
  • Joan Richmond collection(50)

    Three black and white postcards with envelope from Joan Richmond - England
    Nandi Sacred Bull, Banares
    Letter and envelope from Joan Richmond - Cairo
    Envelope to Mrs John Richmond

    The Joan Richmond collection consists of items related to the motor racing career of Joan Richmond. These include a racing suit, goggles, a trophy, number plates, a personal journal, letters, photographs and newspaper clippings.

    Joan Richmond (1905-1999) was a successful racing car driver at a time when women racing drivers were not only a rarity, but competed in the same events as men. Richmond's first major event was the 1931 Australian Grand Prix at Phillip Island in which she drove a Riley and placed a creditable fifth. Shortly after, Richmond and four friends embarked on an overland journey from Australia to Europe in order to compete in the Monte Carlo rally. This journey is credited as the first international overland tour to have originated from Australia. Following the group's successful completion of the rally, Victor Riley offerd to sponsor Richmond and in 1932, she supported the English racing car driver, Elsie Wisdom, to win the 1000 Mile Race at Brooklands. Throughout the 1930s, Richmond stayed in England and competed in more motor racing events, including several Monte Carlo rallies and the Le Mans 24 Hour race. She returned to Australia in the 1940s but was unable to continue her motor racing career due to a lack of money and sponsorship. Joan Richmond died in Melbourne in 1999.

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