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National Museum of Australia

Collection Explorer

4

Collections

  • Neil Jensen collection(72)

    Letter from DeHavilland Aircraft Co Ltd to Mons F. Dufaux, 11 March 1936
    Weight and Centre of Gravity Schedule for G-AERD, 16 March 1980
    Hand-written note recording Aileron, Elevator and Rudder Movements
    Account from the Hotel George V, Paris, 13 September 1936

    The Neil Jensen collection consists of a Percival Gull Six aircraft, G-AERD, and associated archive. Made by the Percival Aircraft Company at Gravesend in Kent, England, in 1936, this aircraft was first purchased by Ariane Dufaux of Switzerland and registered as HB-OFU. After passing through several owners in Switzerland, the aircraft was sold to a collector and restored by Cliff Lovell in England where it was featured on the air show circuit and registered as G-AERD. Neil Jensen purchased G-AERD in 1983, and while it was based in Redhill, Surrey it was awarded the Percival Trophy by the Cotswold Aircraft Restoration Group.

    Born in Albury, New South Wales, in 1897, Edgar Wikner Percival served in Europe and Egypt with the Royal Flying Corps during the First World War. Returning to Australia after the war, Percival operated a commercial aviation business while pursuing opportunities to design and manufacture new types of aircraft. In 1929, he travelled to England to work as a test pilot for the Bristol Aircraft Company, and in 1930 designed and manufactured the first low-wing cantilever monoplanes in the British Commonwealth. Percival formed the Percival Aircraft Company in 1932 and named the new aircraft series 'Gull'. Characterised by their graceful lines, the Gulls had light wooden frames covered with doped (lacquered) fabric and powerful four or six cylinder engines. PercivalÂ?s Gulls quickly established a reputation for high performance, with Percival designing racing versions named 'Mew Gulls', which won acclaim in the Kings Cup Air Race.

  • Josef Lebovic Gallery collection no. 1(7553)

    Ferns, with a fence in the foreground.
    Pitt St. Sydney, looking south and Off Sydney Heads
    The Witch
    Michell Valley Motel, Bairnsdale, Vic
  • Springfield - Faithfull Family collection(3501)

    Wrapping paper
    The Tourist.
    Envelope addressed to Miss Faithfull
    'Reginald's Last Wishes' signed by George Faithfull and H Montague Faithfull

    The Springfield Collection comprises about 1550 artefacts from Springfield station, south of Goulburn. It includes colonial era costume, a bushranger medal, surveying instruments, a late-19th century landau, firearms and edged weapons, wool samples and Joseph Foveaux's pocket watch and bible. The objects are complemented by over 400 photographs. This diverse collection reflects the growth and economic success of the property, responses to changes in the wool market and the daily lives of the people who have lived on Springfield.

    Springfield has grown from a 518-hectare land grant given to William Pitt Faithfull in 1828 to the current 3183 hectares with ownership remaining in the one family. William Pitt Faithfull established the Springfield Merino Stud in 1838 with ten rams selected from the Macarthur Camden Park stud. The stud evolved slowly over the years until the early 1950s when, under the management of Jim Maple-Brown, a scientific approach to wool-growing was adopted and the stud's name was changed to Fonthill to reflect this.

  • Embroiderers' Guilds of Australia collection(138)

    Handwritten note found with sampler in folder
    Photocopy of technical diagram for installation and display of Parliament House Embroidery, side elevation
    Letter from Embroiderers' Guild of Tasmania
    Photocopy of technical diagrams for installation and display of Parliament House Embroidery, front elevation

    This collection of fabric samples, stranded wools and cottons, samplers, seams, design cartoons and transfer material, mounts, needlework equipment, notes and photographs details the process of the making of the Parliament House Embroidery by members of the embroiderers' guilds of all eight States and Territories.

    The Parliament House Embroidery was created in a community gesture as a gift to the nation, one of many such initiatives around the time of the Bicentenary of European settlement in Australia. However, the scale of the embroidery was without precedent in Australia and the process of its making could be considered a historic event. The collection documents the extent of research, practice, experimentation and discussion undertaken by the highly skilled and imaginative needlewomen - all of whom were volunteers - as they evaluated materials and explored techniques to best interpret designer Kay Lawrence's painted cartoon. In charting the realisation of the Parliament House Embroidery, and its own concepts of national identity and relationships to land, the collection also provides opportunities for discussions of the art/craft debate, women's creative expression, collaborative and community art, and the nature of volunteering in Australia.The collection is additionally invaluable in documenting the evolution of a traditional craft practice into an art form in twentieth-century Australia.

  • Dr Herbert Basedow collection(424)

    Film negative - Different ways of wearing the hair, Petermann Ranges, Northern Territory, photographed by Herbert Basedow, 1926
    Oval toy shield made from wood, with three sticks inserted through two holes in the posterior surface, to form the handle
    Film negative - Morning reflections on a billabong off the Wilton River, Arnhem Land, Northern Territory, photographed by Herbert Basedow, 1928
    Film negative - entrance to a limestone cave on the Nullabor Plain, South Australia, photographed by Herbert Basedow, 1920
  • Timothy Millett collection(314)

    Convict love token from A.B.
    Convict love token from Joseph Podmore and John Sheperd, 1769
    Convict love token from I. Gardinner
    Convict love token from Edward Hawkins, 1834

    The Timothy Millett collection comprises 307 convict love tokens dating from 1762 to 1856, and seven contemporary documents relating to the criminal justice system including: recommendations to commute the death sentences of Hester Sampson and Thomas Hayes to life transportation; a calendar of prisoners awaiting trial in the goals of Durham, Newcastle and Northumberland; a request to the Middlesex assizes for rewards to be paid; a printed copy of George Skene's last speech prior to execution; a printed broadside listing prisoners in Dorchester jail awaiting transportation; and a 60 page handwritten account of the life of Thomas Jones, who was transported twice and finally hanged at Winchester Prison in 1856.

    Convict love tokens, typically made from smoothed-down coins and engraved or stippled with a message, derive from traditional sailors' farewells. The production of these 'leaden hearts' rose as criminal indictments increased in Britain, with the majority produced during the 1820s and 1830s. As mementos made by or for convicts facing transportation (or death) to leave behind for their loved ones, the tokens provide a poignant, personal insight into the transportation system.

  • Nova Peris collection(89)

    Pair of running shoes
    Running shoe, right
    Sydney Olympic relay torch signed by Muhammad Ali, 2000
    Official Atlanta 1996 Olympic Games Participants Pin.

    The Nova Peris Collection comprises fifty-three items relating to Nova Peris' sporting and artistic career. It includes her gold medals from the 1994 Hockey World Cup, 1995 Hockey Champions Trophy, 1996 Atlanta Olympics, 1998 Commonwealth Games and the 2001 Australian National Championships. Also included are her team uniforms and ephemera relating to the two Olympic Games and one Commonwealth Games at which she competed. Her torch and torchbearer's uniform from the Sydney Olympics Torch Relay, two commemorative coins she co-designed for the Sydney Olympics and her Order of Australia medal are also in the collection.

    Nova Peris is an Australian athlete and artist who has achieved considerable success. She is a member of the Muran clan (traditional owners of Kakadu) who started her international sporting career as a member of the Australian Women's Hockey Team, with whom she won gold medals at the 1994 Hockey World Cup, 1995 Hockey Champions Trophy and the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games. In 1996 she became the first Aboriginal person and the first person from the Northern Territory to win an Olympic gold medal. She then decided to focus on athletics in which she won gold medals both as an individual athlete and as part of a relay team at the 1998 Commonwealth Games. Ms Peris also competed in Athletics at the Sydney Olympic Games and won a further gold medal at the 2001 Australian National Championships. She is one of the few people to represent their country at an Olympic level in two distinct sports, and is the first and only athlete to win Olympic gold in one sport and Commonwealth gold in another. She was the first torchbearer in Australia for the Sydney Olympics torch relay, co-designed two commemorative coins for the Sydney Olympics and also designed three Olympic pins and a Swatch watch. Ms Peris was a delegate to the 1998 Australian Constitutional Convention and is an active campaigner for indigenous rights and reconciliation. She was awarded the Order of Australia in 1997.

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs Art (ATSIAA) collection(2104)

    Shield with red square - QLD - painted by Paul Bong
    Silk batik orange and brown colours
    Young Girls by Wally Mandarrk
    Woven fibre pubic cover.

    The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs Art collection comprises 2050 artworks and other objects. The artworks - which numerically dominate the collection - were produced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities throughout Australia. The accumulation of these artworks into a single collection has resulted from the choices and selections made during a 38 year period by a variety of staff working for the Council for Aboriginal Affairs (CAA), the Department of Aboriginal Affairs (DAA), the Aboriginal Development Commission (ADC) and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission (ATSIC) at the national, regional and local levels.

    The collection spans the years following the 1967 referendum, when dramatic changes in the governance of Aboriginal people took place, up to 2005 when the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission was dissolved. It provides a snapshot of the diversity and changes in Indigenous art and its representation which occurred during the period of its formation. The small number of 'non-art' objects in the collection is also significant in providing insights into the working of the various Commonwealth bodies involved in Indigenous affairs. As well as the significance of many of the individual pieces, the collection is also significant as a whole, as a complex artefact stemming from Australia's history of governance of Australian Indigenous peoples.

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