page loading
Menu toggle

National Museum of Australia

Collection Explorer

4

Collections

  • Josef Lebovic Gallery collection no. 1(7553)

    Collins ST, Hobart, Tasmania
    Fountain in Machattie Park, Bathurst, N.S.W, 1907
    Pitt Street, from Herald Corner
    View over a town
  • Andrzej Jedrzejowski collection(37)

    Certificate
    Certificate written in Polish permitting A Jedrzejowski to drive an Army car
    Certificate written in Polish and English permitting A Jedrzejowski leave from 18-19 August 1945
    Certificate written in Polish and English permitting A Jedrzejowski one day's leave from Italy
  • Ben Chifley collection no.3(3)

    Bathurst District R.S.L. Band
    New South Wales Ambulance Transport Service Bathurst District
    Bathurst City Croquet Club

    The objects in the Ben Chifley Collection refer to the lives of Ben and Elizabeth Chifley, primarily from the Chifleys' days as Prime Minister and Prime Minister's wife, but stretching beyond Ben's death in 1951 until Elizabeth's death in 1962. Significant objects include a letter of condolence to Elizabeth Chifley from Elsie Curtin (former PM John Curtin's wife) on the death of Ben Chifley (above), photos of Chifley as a young boy and a bible on which Chifley was sworn in as minister in the short-lived Scullin government of 1931.

    Joseph Benedict Chifley was Australia's sixteenth Prime Minister, leading the Australian government between 1945 and 1949. This period was one of particular importance in Australian history, being the time during which many of the contours of post-War Australian social and economic development were established. Chifley also articulated the values of the reforming Labor Party in his "Light on the Hill" speech of 1949. However, the election of December that year saw the beginning of a drastic re-alignment of political allegiances in voting behaviour, leading to over twenty years of conservative dominance in Australian politics. An understanding of Ben Chifley, in both his private and public guises, illustrates much about this crucial era in post-War Australian history.

  • Mary Nicholson collection no. 2(19)

    Super Sweetener
    Don's Truth Drug
    Princely Gravy
    Bush Tucker
  • Springfield - Faithfull Family collection(3501)

    Ladies black patent[?] leather left shoe, with black and red beading on the front and straps
    Envelope addressed to
    Mauve leather right shoe, with a baby Louis heel and a narrow pointed toe
    label attached to Colt Model 1851 Navy revolver

    The Springfield Collection comprises about 1550 artefacts from Springfield station, south of Goulburn. It includes colonial era costume, a bushranger medal, surveying instruments, a late-19th century landau, firearms and edged weapons, wool samples and Joseph Foveaux's pocket watch and bible. The objects are complemented by over 400 photographs. This diverse collection reflects the growth and economic success of the property, responses to changes in the wool market and the daily lives of the people who have lived on Springfield.

    Springfield has grown from a 518-hectare land grant given to William Pitt Faithfull in 1828 to the current 3183 hectares with ownership remaining in the one family. William Pitt Faithfull established the Springfield Merino Stud in 1838 with ten rams selected from the Macarthur Camden Park stud. The stud evolved slowly over the years until the early 1950s when, under the management of Jim Maple-Brown, a scientific approach to wool-growing was adopted and the stud's name was changed to Fonthill to reflect this.

  • Bill Reid - John Cawte collection(47)

    Carved emu egg by Bill Reid
    Emu egg carved with an image of a man's face and native Australian animals by Bill Reid, 1990
    Carved emu egg by Bill Reid
    Emu egg carved with image of a dingo and possum by Bill Reid

    The Bill Reid - John Cawte Collection comprises a series of emu eggs carved by William 'Bill' Reid (1917 -1993), a renowned Gamilaraay artist from northern-central NSW. The collection contains sixteen emu eggs - fourteen carved, one partly carved and one uncarved. They feature representations of Truganinni, Mum Shirl, the Ella brothers, Bill Reid, Albert Namatjiria and Tony Mundine, Alva Reid - Bill Reid's daughter, as well as John Cawte and Betty Watts (John Cawte's wife).
    The collection also includes Reid's innovative system for internally illuminating each carved egg, consisting of a light stand on a circular cork board with a plastic batten holder and cord, sixteen plastic batten holders, sixteen switch cases, sixteen "push button or bell press" mechanisms, a tungsten 15 watt clear light bulb, seventeen plastic "Café HAG" coffee jar lids.

    The collection is significant as constituting a rare series of representations of prominent Indigenous people and other figures undertaken by a renowned Aboriginal artist. As a set of carved emu eggs it is also an important contribution to the National Museum's collection of 20th century Indigenous craft objects. The collection compliments an existing NHC collection of six carved eggs depicting prominent Indigenous figures also carved by Reid.

  • Timothy Millett collection(314)

    Convict love token from Henry Stanley, 1837
    Convict love token from John Bryan, 1835
    Convict love token from William Holmes, 1844
    Convict love token from Thomas Spicer, January 17, 1818

    The Timothy Millett collection comprises 307 convict love tokens dating from 1762 to 1856, and seven contemporary documents relating to the criminal justice system including: recommendations to commute the death sentences of Hester Sampson and Thomas Hayes to life transportation; a calendar of prisoners awaiting trial in the goals of Durham, Newcastle and Northumberland; a request to the Middlesex assizes for rewards to be paid; a printed copy of George Skene's last speech prior to execution; a printed broadside listing prisoners in Dorchester jail awaiting transportation; and a 60 page handwritten account of the life of Thomas Jones, who was transported twice and finally hanged at Winchester Prison in 1856.

    Convict love tokens, typically made from smoothed-down coins and engraved or stippled with a message, derive from traditional sailors' farewells. The production of these 'leaden hearts' rose as criminal indictments increased in Britain, with the majority produced during the 1820s and 1830s. As mementos made by or for convicts facing transportation (or death) to leave behind for their loved ones, the tokens provide a poignant, personal insight into the transportation system.

  • Springfield Merino Stud collection(166)

    Special Prize card awarded at the Murrumbidgee Annual Show, Wagga Wagga, 1889
    Certificate awarded at the Murrumbidgee Annual Show, 1887, First Prize
    Special Prize card awarded at the Murrumbidgee Annual Show, Wagga Wagga, 1890
    Certificate awarded at the Murrumbidgee Annual Show, 1889, First Prize
More