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National Museum of Australia

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Collection Explorer



  • Josef Lebovic Gallery collection no. 1(7551)

    For the larder
    Brisbane Street, Ipswich, Queensland.
    Shopping area Myrtleford, Vic
    Cooma Street, Yass
  • Beth Dean Carell collection no. 2(78)

    Costume design in gouache and pencil on paper with card backing, showing an Aboriginal woman wearing a feathered pubic apron and wristbands
    Sketch of Beth Dean in a seated dance pose wearing an orange-brown costume with white swirls, [5 min Sketch by Bill Constable 1950]
    Kangaroo Man costume
    Sketch of Beth Dean in a seated dance pose wearing an orange-brown costume with white swirls, [5 min Sketch by Bill Constable 1950]

    The Beth Dean-Carrell archive and collections 1, 2 and 3 comprise a vast array of costumes, photographs, tapes, videos, documents and letters relating to the development, choreography and staging of a number of ballets dealing with Aboriginal myths and legends, including Corroboree, Kurdaitcha and The First Boomerang. As well, the collections contain a large number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, Pacific Islander (e.g. Cook Islands and New Zealand) and Papua New Guinean cultural objects.

    An early concern for, and appreciation of Aboriginal culture, led dancer, choreographer and writer, Beth Dean, and her husband singer, writer and film maker, Victor Carell, to spend several months researching dance in Aboriginal societies in the Northern Territory in 1953, and later, in the Pacific Islands and Papua New Guinea. Their research was assisted by anthropologists such as A. P. Elkin, T.G.H. Strehlow and C. P. Mountford and by traditional elders. Although based on cultural values and customary costume, Dean's ballet performances were interpretations, rather than literal representations, of Aboriginal ceremonial dances. Dean's was the second stage version of Corroboree in 1954, which was set to composer John Antill's musical score, Corroboree, which he completed in 1946. Antill was inspired to incorporate Aboriginal rhythm and melody into symphonic music following meetings with Aboriginal communities at La Perouse in Sydney. Both Dean's and Antill's productions reflected a post- World War II national trend by Australian composers and choreographers towards an intentional Australian cultural identity or national style which incorporated either actual or impressionistic interpretations of Aboriginal music, dance and culture. It is ironic, nonetheless, that Aboriginal people at that time were not considered to be Australian citizens, lacked many basic human rights, and were largely absent, not only from the lives of most urban white Australians, but from the concert performances through which only selective versions of their culture were portrayed. However, while these performances would be considered unacceptable today, Beth Dean's intention was not to further marginalize Aboriginal people but to sensitively and considerately convey to Australian audiences "the ethics, wisdomÂ?discipline [and] harmony of Aboriginal customs and culture.

  • Stan Mitchell collection(1320)

    Palaeolithic European hand axe
    Incised shield with white pigment decoration
    Top grinding stone [stone implement]
    Utilised core [stone implement]
  • Myrtle Wilson collection(87)

    Certificate awarded at the Parramatta Agricultural & Industrial Society Annual Show, 1967 for third prize for an organdie throwover
    Certificate awarded at the Mansfield Agricultural & Pastoral Society Spring Show, 1964 for first prize for a bridge cloth
    Special award certificate given at the Hay Pastoral & Agricultural Association 94th Annual Show, 1966 for a cross stitch delphinium tray cloth
  • Springfield - Faithfull Family collection(3501)

    End of Friar's Grag, Derwent Water
    Dianthus Carthus Ianorum
    Recipe for a cough
    Drawing room at Fonthill between 1905 and 1920

    The Springfield Collection comprises about 1550 artefacts from Springfield station, south of Goulburn. It includes colonial era costume, a bushranger medal, surveying instruments, a late-19th century landau, firearms and edged weapons, wool samples and Joseph Foveaux's pocket watch and bible. The objects are complemented by over 400 photographs. This diverse collection reflects the growth and economic success of the property, responses to changes in the wool market and the daily lives of the people who have lived on Springfield.

    Springfield has grown from a 518-hectare land grant given to William Pitt Faithfull in 1828 to the current 3183 hectares with ownership remaining in the one family. William Pitt Faithfull established the Springfield Merino Stud in 1838 with ten rams selected from the Macarthur Camden Park stud. The stud evolved slowly over the years until the early 1950s when, under the management of Jim Maple-Brown, a scientific approach to wool-growing was adopted and the stud's name was changed to Fonthill to reflect this.

  • Professor Henry and Luise Krips collection(65)

    Kimberley point
    Kimberley point
    Kimberley point
    Kimberley point
  • Neil Jensen collection(72)

    Letter from Percival Aircraft Co. to Mons. F. Dufaux
    Packing Note from Hants & Sussex Aviation Ltd.
    'The Percival `Gull'...Supreme in Comfort and Performance'
    Advice Note from Hants & Sussex Aviation Ltd

    The Neil Jensen collection consists of a Percival Gull Six aircraft, G-AERD, and associated archive. Made by the Percival Aircraft Company at Gravesend in Kent, England, in 1936, this aircraft was first purchased by Ariane Dufaux of Switzerland and registered as HB-OFU. After passing through several owners in Switzerland, the aircraft was sold to a collector and restored by Cliff Lovell in England where it was featured on the air show circuit and registered as G-AERD. Neil Jensen purchased G-AERD in 1983, and while it was based in Redhill, Surrey it was awarded the Percival Trophy by the Cotswold Aircraft Restoration Group.

    Born in Albury, New South Wales, in 1897, Edgar Wikner Percival served in Europe and Egypt with the Royal Flying Corps during the First World War. Returning to Australia after the war, Percival operated a commercial aviation business while pursuing opportunities to design and manufacture new types of aircraft. In 1929, he travelled to England to work as a test pilot for the Bristol Aircraft Company, and in 1930 designed and manufactured the first low-wing cantilever monoplanes in the British Commonwealth. Percival formed the Percival Aircraft Company in 1932 and named the new aircraft series 'Gull'. Characterised by their graceful lines, the Gulls had light wooden frames covered with doped (lacquered) fabric and powerful four or six cylinder engines. Percival's Gulls quickly established a reputation for high performance, with Percival designing racing versions named 'Mew Gulls', which won acclaim in the Kings Cup Air Race.

  • Harold Stevens collection(4)

    Autographic Kodak Junior camera
    Kodak camera case
    Picture taking with the No.1A Autographic Kodak Junior...
    Camera tripod with telescopic legs

    The Harold Stevens collection comprises an A1 Autographic Kodak Junior camera, camera case, instruction booklet and tripod. Amateur photographer Harold Stevens used this equipment during the 1920s and 1930s to document family life at his home in Rockdale, Sydney, and to record activities and scenes on holiday trips.

    Photography has been one of Australia's most popular leisure activities since American George Eastman released the Pocket Kodak camera on to the Australian market in 1896. The new roll-film cameras enabled everyday people to become competent 'snapshot photographers', and by the 1920s most families owned a camera. Amateur photographers created records of their lives, families and experiences. The production and sharing of these images has constituted a significant means by which Australians recorded and narrated their individual histories, family genealogies and social milieu.