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National Museum of Australia

Collection Explorer

4

Collections

  • Josef Lebovic Gallery collection no. 1(7553)

    Postcard with photograph captioned Harbour Bridge, Sydney, August 1929
    Church of England, Nowra, 1919
    The Archibald memorial, Sydney
    Townsville looking North
  • E Milne collection(652)

    Top grinding stone [stone implement]
    Retouched blade [stone implement]
    Top grinding stone [stone implement]
    Retouched flake [stone implement]
  • Springfield Merino Stud collection(166)

    Yass Spring Show, 1906, Second Prize
    Certificate awarded at the Murrumbidgee Annual Show, 1889, Special Prize
    Champion Prize card awarded at the Murrumbidgee Annual Show, 1887
    Prize card awarded at the Murrumbidgee Annual Show, 1885
  • Geoff Finger collection(3)

    Cyclone Tracy evacuation registration card, 1974

    Navy News Vol 18 No. 1, 17 January 1975

    Booklet titled Cyclone Tracy - Darwin 1974

  • Macleay Museum collection(4)

    Wooden box containing phonograph attachments used by anthropologist AP Elkin in 1927
    Patrol Box No.1 used by anthropologist Ian Hogbin in the Solomon Islands and New Guinea, 1933-1935
    Phonograph used by anthropologist AP Elkin on his first expedition in 1927 to the Kimberley
    Circular black metal hat box used by anthropologist Olive Pink

    The Macleay Museum collection comprises four objects associated with Australian anthropologists and their fieldwork expeditions in the first half of the twentieth century. These objects include a painted wooden supply box belonging to Ian Hogbin, circa 1933-1935, black metal hatbox used by Olive Pink (1884-1975) and a 1906 Edison Standard Phonograph recorder and wooden box containing phonograph attachments used by A P (Adolphus Peter) Elkin (1891-1979) in 1927.

    Unconventional Â? often controversial - artist, Aboriginal-rights activist, anthropologist and gardener, Olive Pink lived and worked among the eastern Arrernte of Alice Springs and the Warlpiri of the Tanami region. Olive Pink's extraordinary life was marked by her passionate advocacy for Aboriginal rights, and for her constant scrutiny of the actions of governments, civil servants, missionaries, academics, pastoralists, the courts and police. Shunning traditional anthropological practices, Olive Pink lived with Walpiri people at ThompsonÂ?s Rockhole in the Tanami Desert for several years, before "retiring" to Alice Springs in 1946 where she continued to fight for social justice, autonomy and dignity of Aboriginal people. The arid-zone flora reserve which she established Altjere-Tjukurpa (Dreaming) Reserve , has been renamed the "Olive Pink Botanical Garden" in honour of this remarkable woman. Olive PinkÂ?s hatbox serves to remind us of her exceptional life and her eccentricities, such as the hats she was known always to wear, with long, white, high-collared Edwardian dress and gloves, regardless of heat. Anthropologist, Herbert Ian Priestley Hogbin (1904-1989) conducted a series of field studies in Melanesia in 1933-1934, first in Guadalcanal and Malaita in the British Solomon Islands Protectorate, and then in Wogeo in the Mandated Territory of New Guinea. He was appointed to a permanent position in the anthropology department at the University of Sydney in 1936 by its new head A P Elkin, holding the position until his retirement in 1969. According to anthropologist Jeremy Beckett, Ian Hogbin loved the isolation and deprivation which fieldwork in his day had entailed. He is remembered for his pioneering research in the Pacific Islands and his influence on the formative development of anthropology in Australia. Appointed as professor in 1933, Elkin remained in charge of the anthropology department at Sydney University until 1956, during which time he was virtually in total charge of anthropology in Australia. According to biographical notes, the Edison phonograph recorder in this collection had been picked up by Elkin for three pounds at a shop near Central Railway in preparation for his first field trip to the Kimberley in 1927, and was probably transported by donkey wagon during the expedition. The recorder would have been profoundly strange to the remote Aboriginal people whose music he intended to record, but is a reminder of the meticulous observation and recording practices for which Elkin was well known. Elkin later said the recorder had proved unsatisfactory.

  • Springfield - Faithfull Family collection(3501)

    Primula Vulgaris
    Envelope addressed to Mrs I. A.(sic) Maple Brown / Fonthill / Lake Bathurst / via Goulburn / NSW
    Four horses and four men, in stalls of stable at Springfield.
    Black and white photograph of Augustus Lucian Faithfull

    The Springfield Collection comprises about 1550 artefacts from Springfield station, south of Goulburn. It includes colonial era costume, a bushranger medal, surveying instruments, a late-19th century landau, firearms and edged weapons, wool samples and Joseph Foveaux's pocket watch and bible. The objects are complemented by over 400 photographs. This diverse collection reflects the growth and economic success of the property, responses to changes in the wool market and the daily lives of the people who have lived on Springfield.

    Springfield has grown from a 518-hectare land grant given to William Pitt Faithfull in 1828 to the current 3183 hectares with ownership remaining in the one family. William Pitt Faithfull established the Springfield Merino Stud in 1838 with ten rams selected from the Macarthur Camden Park stud. The stud evolved slowly over the years until the early 1950s when, under the management of Jim Maple-Brown, a scientific approach to wool-growing was adopted and the stud's name was changed to Fonthill to reflect this.

  • Nanette Ward collection(226)

    R.B. Benjamin manager of the Australian Cricket team and Sir Thomas Tait
    Dinner menu from R.M.S. Niagara with the autographs of the 1913 Australian Cricket team
    Handwritten note on the history of the Cullinan Diamond, written in Johannesburg by E R Mayne whilst on tour with the Australian Cricket Team in 1921
    Autograph book containing the autographs of Australian, English, Scottish & South African cricketers that Mayne played against during the 1921 tour to England and South Africa
  • Joan Richmond collection(50)

    Car driving goggles and tin relating to Joan Richmond
    Letter and envelope from Joan Richmond - India
    Envelope containing a letter from Joan Richmond to her mother
    Envelope to Mrs. John Richmond

    The Joan Richmond collection consists of items related to the motor racing career of Joan Richmond. These include a racing suit, goggles, a trophy, number plates, a personal journal, letters, photographs and newspaper clippings.

    Joan Richmond (1905-1999) was a successful racing car driver at a time when women racing drivers were not only a rarity, but competed in the same events as men. Richmond's first major event was the 1931 Australian Grand Prix at Phillip Island in which she drove a Riley and placed a creditable fifth. Shortly after, Richmond and four friends embarked on an overland journey from Australia to Europe in order to compete in the Monte Carlo rally. This journey is credited as the first international overland tour to have originated from Australia. Following the group's successful completion of the rally, Victor Riley offerd to sponsor Richmond and in 1932, she supported the English racing car driver, Elsie Wisdom, to win the 1000 Mile Race at Brooklands. Throughout the 1930s, Richmond stayed in England and competed in more motor racing events, including several Monte Carlo rallies and the Le Mans 24 Hour race. She returned to Australia in the 1940s but was unable to continue her motor racing career due to a lack of money and sponsorship. Joan Richmond died in Melbourne in 1999.

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