page loading
Menu toggle

National Museum of Australia

Collection Explorer

4

Collections

  • Woodleigh Shorthorn Stud collection(85)

    Certificate
    Certificate
    Certificate
    Certificate

    The Woodleigh Shorthorn Stud Collection is an extensive collection of trophies, ribbons, medals, badges, prize certificates, showing equipment and stud cattle photographs. The items are associated with a beef shorthorn stud established by the Davis family of the Corowa district in the early 1950s, and are in good condition.

    These objects record a recent expression of a long tradition of showing stud livestock at agricultural shows in Australia and Britain. Stud competitions at annual shows in Australian cities and regional centres enabled the gradual improvement of sheep and cattle herds. Shorthorn cattle proved adaptable and hardy in Australia, and became one of the dominant breeds. The Woodleigh Shorthorn Stud Collection helps to record the successful establishment of the shorthorn breed in Australia and the role of agricultural shows in enabling the improvement of cattle breeds. The collection also reflects the dramatic changes experienced by the rural sector in the second half of the twentieth century as tightening economic conditions forced many rural families, including the Davis family, to sell their properties.

  • Elizabeth Kay collection no. 2(19)

    Sepia photograph the Coolgardie Farm and Dairy Produce Action Auction Mart
    Invitation to a Garden Party on 14 May 1937 to celebrate the coronation of Queen Elizabeth
    Dance card from the State Ball at Old Parliament House in 1937
    Photograph of Harry Hawker and his Sopwith aircraft at Caulfield Racecourse 1914

    The Elizabeth Kay Collection consists primarily of early Canberra tourist ephemera, dance cards and invitations for Canberra events during the 1930s, and a variety of other items dating from the 1920s and 1930s related to aviation, Boy Scouts, Commonwealth Railways and anthropological research. The material relates to Kay, her family and their interests.

    Mrs Kay (nee Moss) moved to Canberra in 1926, after completing her education in Melbourne, joining her father Mr HP Moss who had been working in the position of Chief Electrical Engineer in Canberra since 1912. The objects relating to aviation, the Commonwealth Railways and anthropological research came into Mrs Kay's possession through her father, who collected Aboriginal artefacts from a number of sites in the Canberra area. A program from the 1934 Australian Scout Jamboree Sunday service was given to Kay's brother, John Maxwell Moss, who attended the event. Kay's aunt, Hilda Maxwell (later Lyall) and eldest brother, James Maxwell Moss, are pirctured among the crowd watching Harry Hawker flying over Caulfield Racecourse in 1914. The invitations and dance cards for balls held at Old Parliament House and at the Forestry Commission during 1933, 1934 and 1936, relate directly to Mrs Kay and her husband, Cecil Kay, dating from before their marriage with 'Miss Elizabeth Moss' favoured for numerous dances on Mr Kay's dance cards. The Canberra tourist ephemera belonged to Cecil Kay and were likely purchased in 1932. The open letter written to Prince Edward of Wales on his Royal Tour in 1920 expressing the importance of patriotism towards the British Empire was given to Mrs Kay at her primary school in Melbourne.

  • Josef Lebovic Gallery collection no. 1(7553)

    Red bird of paradise
    Woolamai - Powlett, Coalfield Rly
    Entrance to Lane Cove
    City of Sydney (Martin Place and Cenotaph)
  • Carmelo Mirabelli collection no. 1(20)

    Zeiss Ikon Nettar camera and case
    Tin for Bells Waterproof matches
    Remittancer's record card
    Kerosene fueled stove with a single burner

    The Carmelo Mirabelli collection consists of 16 items relating to Mr Mirabelli's six years of itinerant work after migrating from Sicily to Australia in 1951. He travelled between Ingham, Qld; Shepparton and Mildura, Vic. following the seasonal harvests of sugar cane in Queensland and stone fruit and grapes in Victoria in order to find a 'home' in Australia. The collection includes his cane-cutting knife, fruit-picking apron, grape picking basket, camera, bicycle, kerosene stove and Remitter's Record Card which he used to send money to his mother in war-ravaged Sicily.

    The Mirabelli collection reflects aspects of post-WWII Italian migration. It is representative of itinerant or seasonal workers lives in the post war period and how these flows of people connected Queensland to Victoria. The fact that Mr Mirabelli encouraged other cane cutters to pick fruit in Shepparton supports this. The collection adds to the understanding of post war agricultural history, particularly that of fruit picking and cane cutting which are not represented in the NHC. The Mirabelli collection also illustrates how phases of mobility and consolidation were part of the Italian male migrant experience in the post war era.

  • Nanette Ward collection(226)

    Length of chestnut coloured horse hair from the horse
    CARBINE'S MELBOURNE CUP 3 MIN 28 + 4 SEC
    Black and white photograph of E.R. Mayne walking off the cricket field, 1921
    Black and white photograph of the Australian Cricket team at the Leicester Cricket Ground
  • Springfield - Faithfull Family collection(3501)

    Granted for Gallant and Faithful Services
    Membership card for Mrs W.H. Faithfull Anderson to the Australian Polo Club
    Florence Faithfull seated on a chair and Constance Faithfull seated on the floor beside her.
    Photograph - Group of adults and children - Empire Day 1907

    The Springfield Collection comprises about 1550 artefacts from Springfield station, south of Goulburn. It includes colonial era costume, a bushranger medal, surveying instruments, a late-19th century landau, firearms and edged weapons, wool samples and Joseph Foveaux's pocket watch and bible. The objects are complemented by over 400 photographs. This diverse collection reflects the growth and economic success of the property, responses to changes in the wool market and the daily lives of the people who have lived on Springfield.

    Springfield has grown from a 518-hectare land grant given to William Pitt Faithfull in 1828 to the current 3183 hectares with ownership remaining in the one family. William Pitt Faithfull established the Springfield Merino Stud in 1838 with ten rams selected from the Macarthur Camden Park stud. The stud evolved slowly over the years until the early 1950s when, under the management of Jim Maple-Brown, a scientific approach to wool-growing was adopted and the stud's name was changed to Fonthill to reflect this.

  • Myrtle Wilson collection(87)

    Certificate awarded at the Captain Cook Bi-Centenary N.S.W Glouster Show for first prize for a tatted butterfly doily
    Certificate awarded at the Kerang District Agricultural Society 84th Annual Show, 1968 for first prize for an appliqued doily
    Certificate awarded at the Mansfield Agricultural & Pastoral Society Spring Show, 1964 for first prize for a bridge cloth
    Certificate awarded at the Inverelle P & A Association, 1973 for second prize for a tatted butterfly doily
  • Chai Vang and Por Ye collection(12)

    Hoe blade
    Wooden arrow with cardboard fletching or fin
    Wooden crossbow with bark string
    Wooden arrow with cardboard fletching or fin

    The collection consists of one dibble (or digging stick), four cardboard signs, two knives, the head of a small hoe, a cross-bow and arrows used by Chai Vang and Por Ye, Hmong market gardeners in Tasmania. The metal objects were made in Thailand by Chai Vang's father, a traditional Hmong blacksmith, and the wooden items and cardboard signs were made by Chai in Hobart.

    Chai Vang and Por Ye arrived in Australia with their eight children as refugees from Laos in 1991. The family settled in Hobart, Tasmania within the small Hmong community that had established itself during the 1970s. In 2000 the family began to farm on several acres of land near Hobart and sell their produce at the Salamanca Markets. The Hmong market gardeners have become an important part of Tasmania's social, cultural and agricultural scene through their involvement with the Salamanca Markets and their willingness to share aspects of their traditional culture with the wider community.

More