page loading
Menu toggle

National Museum of Australia

Collection Explorer

4

Collections

  • Josef Lebovic Gallery collection no. 1(7553)

    [Thomas] Walker Hospital near Sydney
    College Street, Sydney
    Postcard of  Adelaide, The Proclamation Tree
    She must suffer to look beautiful
  • Colledge Family collection(296)

    Photograph of the horse
    Photograph of Emilie Roach next to mount 'Dungog'
    Narrandera Show medal 1930
    Royal Melbourne Show Third Prize certificate awarded to MISS E. ROACH, Exhibit THE VICTOREE FOOD PRODUCTS, LADIES RIDING COMP. OVER FENCES, Class 239 No. 3880
  • Springfield - Faithfull Family collection(3501)

    Side saddle
    Paper fragment from a book with handwriting
    Doronicum Grandiflorum
    The Pass of Brander, Loch Awe

    The Springfield Collection comprises about 1550 artefacts from Springfield station, south of Goulburn. It includes colonial era costume, a bushranger medal, surveying instruments, a late-19th century landau, firearms and edged weapons, wool samples and Joseph Foveaux's pocket watch and bible. The objects are complemented by over 400 photographs. This diverse collection reflects the growth and economic success of the property, responses to changes in the wool market and the daily lives of the people who have lived on Springfield.

    Springfield has grown from a 518-hectare land grant given to William Pitt Faithfull in 1828 to the current 3183 hectares with ownership remaining in the one family. William Pitt Faithfull established the Springfield Merino Stud in 1838 with ten rams selected from the Macarthur Camden Park stud. The stud evolved slowly over the years until the early 1950s when, under the management of Jim Maple-Brown, a scientific approach to wool-growing was adopted and the stud's name was changed to Fonthill to reflect this.

  • Ellen Rogers collection(15)

    Clothes brush
    Silver plated metal and horse-hair hair brush
    Dressing case containing two hair brushes, two clothes brushes, a comb and a mirror
    Souvenir half main bearing of the Central Engine from the Southern Cross used on Pacific, Australian, Tasman and English flights 1928-1929

    The Ellen Rogers collection consists of fifteen items of memorabilia associated with Australian aviation pioneers, Sir Charles Kingsford Smith and Charles Ulm. The collection consist of a half-size bronze life-mask of Sir Charles Kingsford-Smith; full-size bronze life-mask of Charles Ulm; propeller hub of an Australian National Airways Ltd (ANA) Avro X Lynx engine; half-main bearing removed from the central engine of the 'Southern Cross' aircraft after the 1928 trans-Pacific flight; Charles Ulm's attaché case; framed composite photograph with dedication; black and white photograph of 'Faith in Australia'; commemorative wall clock mounted in a propeller; and a velvet covered timber dressing case containing silver plated brushes, comb and mirror. The objects in this collection, many of them presented as gifts to Rogers, reflect the respect and affection Kingsford Smith and Ulm held for their secretary whom they referred to as 'Rog'.

    In 1928, Charles Kingsford Smith and Charles Ulm became the first aviators to cross the Pacific Ocean by air in the 'Southern Cross'. With two American crewmembers, they took off from Oakland, California, on 31 May 1928 and flew via Hawaii and Suva to Brisbane, completing the historic 11,585 kilometre crossing in 83 hours, 38 minutes, of flying time. Kingsford Smith and Ulm were awarded the Air Force Cross and given honorary commissions in the Royal Australian Air Force. In December 1928, they founded Australian National Airways Ltd (ANA) as a passenger, mail and freight service between cities and towns in eastern Australia. Mounting financial difficulties forced ANA to suspend all passenger services in June 1931, and the company entered voluntary liquidation in February 1933. The two aviators died tragically while pursing their interests - Ulm disappearing in December 1934 flying between California and Hawaii, and Kingsford Smith lost without trace in 1935 off the coast of Burma. Ellen Rogers was employed as secretary to Kingsford Smith and Ulm following the trans-Pacific flight, during the establishment and operation of ANA, and continued working as private secretary to Charles Ulm until his death.

  • Elizabeth Kay collection no. 2(19)

    Supper card for the 1934 State Ball at Old Parliament House
    Sepia photograph the Coolgardie Farm and Dairy Produce Action Auction Mart
    Photograph of Harry Hawker and his Sopwith aircraft at Caulfield Racecourse 1914
    Scout jamboree service program from the Australian Jamboree on 30 December 1934

    The Elizabeth Kay Collection consists primarily of early Canberra tourist ephemera, dance cards and invitations for Canberra events during the 1930s, and a variety of other items dating from the 1920s and 1930s related to aviation, Boy Scouts, Commonwealth Railways and anthropological research. The material relates to Kay, her family and their interests.

    Mrs Kay (nee Moss) moved to Canberra in 1926, after completing her education in Melbourne, joining her father Mr HP Moss who had been working in the position of Chief Electrical Engineer in Canberra since 1912. The objects relating to aviation, the Commonwealth Railways and anthropological research came into Mrs Kay's possession through her father, who collected Aboriginal artefacts from a number of sites in the Canberra area. A program from the 1934 Australian Scout Jamboree Sunday service was given to Kay's brother, John Maxwell Moss, who attended the event. Kay's aunt, Hilda Maxwell (later Lyall) and eldest brother, James Maxwell Moss, are pirctured among the crowd watching Harry Hawker flying over Caulfield Racecourse in 1914. The invitations and dance cards for balls held at Old Parliament House and at the Forestry Commission during 1933, 1934 and 1936, relate directly to Mrs Kay and her husband, Cecil Kay, dating from before their marriage with 'Miss Elizabeth Moss' favoured for numerous dances on Mr Kay's dance cards. The Canberra tourist ephemera belonged to Cecil Kay and were likely purchased in 1932. The open letter written to Prince Edward of Wales on his Royal Tour in 1920 expressing the importance of patriotism towards the British Empire was given to Mrs Kay at her primary school in Melbourne.

  • Timothy Millett collection(314)

    Convict love token from Patrick Grady, 1830
    Convict love token from D. Frazier, 1835
    Convict love token from George Norman
    Convict love token from J. Haley, 1833

    The Timothy Millett collection comprises 307 convict love tokens dating from 1762 to 1856, and seven contemporary documents relating to the criminal justice system including: recommendations to commute the death sentences of Hester Sampson and Thomas Hayes to life transportation; a calendar of prisoners awaiting trial in the goals of Durham, Newcastle and Northumberland; a request to the Middlesex assizes for rewards to be paid; a printed copy of George Skene's last speech prior to execution; a printed broadside listing prisoners in Dorchester jail awaiting transportation; and a 60 page handwritten account of the life of Thomas Jones, who was transported twice and finally hanged at Winchester Prison in 1856.

    Convict love tokens, typically made from smoothed-down coins and engraved or stippled with a message, derive from traditional sailors' farewells. The production of these 'leaden hearts' rose as criminal indictments increased in Britain, with the majority produced during the 1820s and 1830s. As mementos made by or for convicts facing transportation (or death) to leave behind for their loved ones, the tokens provide a poignant, personal insight into the transportation system.

  • Ben Chifley collection no. 3(53)

    Four letters of condolence to Mrs Clark and two photographs
    Invitation to Mrs Chifley, to a State Ball in honour of the Elizabeth, the Queen Mother
    Letter from Bathurst District Hospital to Mrs Elizabeth Chifley
    Bushfire Appeal

    The objects in the Ben Chifley Collection refer to the lives of Ben and Elizabeth Chifley, primarily from the Chifleys' days as Prime Minister and Prime Minister's wife, but stretching beyond Ben's death in 1951 until Elizabeth's death in 1962. Significant objects include a letter of condolence to Elizabeth Chifley from Elsie Curtin (former PM John Curtin's wife) on the death of Ben Chifley (above), photos of Chifley as a young boy and a bible on which Chifley was sworn in as minister in the short-lived Scullin government of 1931.

    Joseph Benedict Chifley was Australia's sixteenth Prime Minister, leading the Australian government between 1945 and 1949. This period was one of particular importance in Australian history, being the time during which many of the contours of post-War Australian social and economic development were established. Chifley also articulated the values of the reforming Labor Party in his "Light on the Hill" speech of 1949. However, the election of December that year saw the beginning of a drastic re-alignment of political allegiances in voting behaviour, leading to over twenty years of conservative dominance in Australian politics. An understanding of Ben Chifley, in both his private and public guises, illustrates much about this crucial era in post-War Australian history.

  • Macleay Museum collection(4)

    Wooden box containing phonograph attachments used by anthropologist AP Elkin in 1927
    Patrol Box No.1 used by anthropologist Ian Hogbin in the Solomon Islands and New Guinea, 1933-1935
    Phonograph used by anthropologist AP Elkin on his first expedition in 1927 to the Kimberley
    Circular black metal hat box used by anthropologist Olive Pink

    The Macleay Museum collection comprises four objects associated with Australian anthropologists and their fieldwork expeditions in the first half of the twentieth century. These objects include a painted wooden supply box belonging to Ian Hogbin, circa 1933-1935, black metal hatbox used by Olive Pink (1884-1975) and a 1906 Edison Standard Phonograph recorder and wooden box containing phonograph attachments used by A P (Adolphus Peter) Elkin (1891-1979) in 1927.

    Unconventional Â? often controversial - artist, Aboriginal-rights activist, anthropologist and gardener, Olive Pink lived and worked among the eastern Arrernte of Alice Springs and the Warlpiri of the Tanami region. Olive Pink's extraordinary life was marked by her passionate advocacy for Aboriginal rights, and for her constant scrutiny of the actions of governments, civil servants, missionaries, academics, pastoralists, the courts and police. Shunning traditional anthropological practices, Olive Pink lived with Walpiri people at ThompsonÂ?s Rockhole in the Tanami Desert for several years, before "retiring" to Alice Springs in 1946 where she continued to fight for social justice, autonomy and dignity of Aboriginal people. The arid-zone flora reserve which she established Altjere-Tjukurpa (Dreaming) Reserve , has been renamed the "Olive Pink Botanical Garden" in honour of this remarkable woman. Olive PinkÂ?s hatbox serves to remind us of her exceptional life and her eccentricities, such as the hats she was known always to wear, with long, white, high-collared Edwardian dress and gloves, regardless of heat. Anthropologist, Herbert Ian Priestley Hogbin (1904-1989) conducted a series of field studies in Melanesia in 1933-1934, first in Guadalcanal and Malaita in the British Solomon Islands Protectorate, and then in Wogeo in the Mandated Territory of New Guinea. He was appointed to a permanent position in the anthropology department at the University of Sydney in 1936 by its new head A P Elkin, holding the position until his retirement in 1969. According to anthropologist Jeremy Beckett, Ian Hogbin loved the isolation and deprivation which fieldwork in his day had entailed. He is remembered for his pioneering research in the Pacific Islands and his influence on the formative development of anthropology in Australia. Appointed as professor in 1933, Elkin remained in charge of the anthropology department at Sydney University until 1956, during which time he was virtually in total charge of anthropology in Australia. According to biographical notes, the Edison phonograph recorder in this collection had been picked up by Elkin for three pounds at a shop near Central Railway in preparation for his first field trip to the Kimberley in 1927, and was probably transported by donkey wagon during the expedition. The recorder would have been profoundly strange to the remote Aboriginal people whose music he intended to record, but is a reminder of the meticulous observation and recording practices for which Elkin was well known. Elkin later said the recorder had proved unsatisfactory.

More