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National Museum of Australia

Collection Explorer

4

Collections

  • Timothy Millett collection(314)

    Convict love token from T. Lucas, 1834
    Convict love token from Richard Kedge, 1849
    Convict love token from F. Robinson, 1831
    Convict love token from P. Saunders, 1835

    The Timothy Millett collection comprises 307 convict love tokens dating from 1762 to 1856, and seven contemporary documents relating to the criminal justice system including: recommendations to commute the death sentences of Hester Sampson and Thomas Hayes to life transportation; a calendar of prisoners awaiting trial in the goals of Durham, Newcastle and Northumberland; a request to the Middlesex assizes for rewards to be paid; a printed copy of George Skene's last speech prior to execution; a printed broadside listing prisoners in Dorchester jail awaiting transportation; and a 60 page handwritten account of the life of Thomas Jones, who was transported twice and finally hanged at Winchester Prison in 1856.

    Convict love tokens, typically made from smoothed-down coins and engraved or stippled with a message, derive from traditional sailors' farewells. The production of these 'leaden hearts' rose as criminal indictments increased in Britain, with the majority produced during the 1820s and 1830s. As mementos made by or for convicts facing transportation (or death) to leave behind for their loved ones, the tokens provide a poignant, personal insight into the transportation system.

  • Henry Tipper collection(1)

    Promotional card for 'Professor' Henry Tipper and his miniature bicycle, 1919
  • Dr Helen M Wurm collection no. 2(85)

    Bark painting depicts a hunter in white, with short limbs, holding a raised spear and shield
    Painting is an abstract design of patterned & black horizontal bands
    Bark painting depicting the sun at Wuriupi by Deaf Tommy in Snake Bay, Melville Island, 1965
    Painting is divided into numerous squares
  • Diana Boyer collection(137)

    'Time Change'
    'Time Change'
    'Cropping Bobbara' by Diana Boyer
    'Time Change'

    The Diana Boyer collection comprises artworks, annotated sketches and other recordings of life on 'Bobbara Creek', a rural property in the Binalong district of southern NSW, between 1981 and 2007. There are twenty eight items and groups of items in the collection. All are in good condition.

    This collection records the imaginative and emotional processes by which Diana Boyer, a migrant from Argentina, settled in an Australian place. The artworks, sketchbooks and other items show Diana's engagement with the ecological particularities of the Binalong district, and with significant issues arising from the social and economic dynamics of colonial history and the present. The items record Diana's exploration of a range of topics related to her life and work on 'Bobbara Creek', including Aboriginal dispossession, the representation of rural women, the value of biological diversity, the broader implications of introducing genetically modified canola to Australia, and the possible consequences of global warming for Australian agriculture.

  • Benny Zable collection no. 2(137)

    Letter
    Letter
    Letter from Benny Zable to the Organisers of ANZART
    Letter

    The Benny Zable collections comprise a diverse range of large and small objects, including a blue Ford XA panel van, conical road markers, protest banners and badges, costumes, photographs, political posters, leaflets, letters, placards, legal documents and documents. These objects were donated to the Museum by environmental protester, peace activist and performing artist, Benny Zable.

    Born in 1945 and raised in a Jewish family in Melbourne, the tragic senselessness of the 1967 Arab-Israeli War was the first in a series of life changing experiences for Zable who journeyed to Israel in 1968 to work on a kibbutz on the Lebanese border. This transformational experience was followed by visits to London and Paris, which, at that time, were witnessing the rise of counter culture and peace movements. The Paris student uprising in 1968 was a watershed event precipitating the largest general strike ever recorded, bringing France to a virtual standstill. The World Symposium on Humanities in Los Angeles, which Zable attended in 1979, coincided with the America's worst nuclear accident at Three Mile Island nuclear power plant near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. On his return to Australia, Zable became active in anti-nuclear protest organization, Nomadic Action Group (NAG). Using his artistic and performative skills, Zable developed a caricature costume of the grim reaper "I visualised a dark character with a skull head, "Greedozer" to portray the ugly side of civilisation". A pedestal, formed from black painted forty-four gallon drums, allowed for extra height from which to hang protest banners. On receiving an Australia Council for the Arts grant, Zable developed a road show, transporting his costume and toxic tower statue, to which he had added a PA system, a mike in the gas mask, a video display unit and tape deck, in a blue Ford panel van. After touring Australia, Zable travelled first to Asia and then the US, before returning to Australia and settling in Nimbin, northern New South Wales. Benny Zable has been continuously active in protest movements spanning three decades. Most recently, while acting as creative director for New York's Ecofest and attending the UN's International Vigil for peace, Benny brought his performance and costume to support the 2011 New York 'Occupy Wall Street' protest in Manhattan's Zuccotti Park. This protest sparked a series of massive global protest movements among disaffected citizens throughout the world, prompting a remarkable move by Time Magazine to nominate 'The Protester' as its 2011 'Person of the Year'.

  • Nettie McColive collection(189)

    Certificate
    Correspondence School Super Primary Department Progress Certificate for 1st Year Drawing and Applied art
    Certificate
    Certificate

    Needlework has been an important creative outlet for women throughout Australian history. This work has often been denigrated due to the (gendered) divide between high and low culture which regards domestic work as trivial, feminine and unworthy of the title "Art". A reassessment of history informed by womens' history and feminism has led to domestic needlework being acknowledged as more than simply functional labour. The social role of this type of work is now better appreciated making it a vital aspect of domestic material culture.

    This collection consists of objects relating to the life of Minetta (Nettie) McColive (nee Huppatz). Mrs McColive's quilts form the centre piece of the collection. Three of these were made in the 1930's, the Farm Life Quilt, Wildflowers Quilt and the International Quilt. Also featured in the collection are certificates, photographs and d'oyleys. This collection helps to document issues such as women in rural Australia, quilting and needlework, education in the outback, community or commemorative quilting, shows and competitions.

    Mrs McColive's work has been the subject of considerable interest both in South Australia as well as in the general quilting community. Her work is featured in two books, Jennifer Isaac's The Gentle Arts and Margaret Rolfe's Patchwork Quilts in Australia. Her work has also featured in exhibitions such as the Quilt Australia '88 exhibition as well as an exhibition held in Prospect showcasing the work of local artists.

  • William and Jeanette Derham Family - Bendigo Pottery collection(417)

    Salt glazed brown ceramic demijohn [Aqua]
    Ceramic vase shaped as a gothic buttress
    Glazed brown ceramic demijohn with screw-threaded stopper [Mt Lyell M&R Co Ltd, Port Adelaide]
    Ceramic hot water bottle with screw cap

    The William and Jeanette Derham family collection is the physical manifestation of Mr Derham's commitment to documenting the work of Bendigo Pottery, its wares and institutional history, as well as the association he and his family had with the business between 1968 and 1983. The collection consists of historic Bendigo Pottery ceramics from the 19th and 20th centuries which illustrate the diversity of wares produced between 1858 and 1971, as well as a comprehensive range of items manufactured during the Derham era. This material is supported by a unique collection of stamps and printing blocks used as part of the manufacturing and advertising processes as well as documentary materials, photographs and ephemera which illustrate working life at Bendigo Pottery.

    Since its establishment in 1858, Bendigo Pottery has played a significant role in the history of Australian ceramics, producing wares ranging from the domestic and decorative, to the utilitarian and industrial. The history of the business illustrates the process of technological transfer in the decorative arts, the adaptation of imported ceramic traditions to local markets and the development of distinctively Australian imagery, styles and pottery products. Bendigo Pottery has provided useful products and employment opportunities to the community for 150 years and on an aesthetic level ensured that the skills of the potter, which so easily could have been lost with the advent of mass production techniques, have been preserved for posterity.

  • Josef Lebovic Gallery collection no. 1(7553)

    Three nurses standing, one patient sitting in a wheelchair and two patients sitting on beds
    Brick building, with large doors and a barred door and window
    Black's Camp, Queensland
    Lane Cove River, Sydney
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