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National Museum of Australia

Collection Explorer

4

Collections

  • Josef Lebovic Gallery collection no. 1(7553)

    Boondara, showing horse teams pulling wagons loaded with wool bales
    Sepia photograph of horsedrawn boat float
    Australian Mining. Puddling
  • E Milne collection(652)

    Aboriginal breastplate for Jemmy Muggle, King of Wiggley
    Aboriginal breastplate for Jack the Traveller, King of Bendora Bellevue Jembicumbane
    Bottom grinding stone [stone implement]
    Aboriginal breastplate for Dicky, King of Clyde Road
  • Springfield - Faithfull Family collection(3501)

    Mauve leather right shoe, with a baby Louis heel and a narrow pointed toe
    Ladies black patent[?] leather right shoe, with black and red beading on the front and straps
    Extract from Mr Charles Matcham's letters to a relative in England 1834
    The Tourist.

    The Springfield Collection comprises about 1550 artefacts from Springfield station, south of Goulburn. It includes colonial era costume, a bushranger medal, surveying instruments, a late-19th century landau, firearms and edged weapons, wool samples and Joseph Foveaux's pocket watch and bible. The objects are complemented by over 400 photographs. This diverse collection reflects the growth and economic success of the property, responses to changes in the wool market and the daily lives of the people who have lived on Springfield.

    Springfield has grown from a 518-hectare land grant given to William Pitt Faithfull in 1828 to the current 3183 hectares with ownership remaining in the one family. William Pitt Faithfull established the Springfield Merino Stud in 1838 with ten rams selected from the Macarthur Camden Park stud. The stud evolved slowly over the years until the early 1950s when, under the management of Jim Maple-Brown, a scientific approach to wool-growing was adopted and the stud's name was changed to Fonthill to reflect this.

  • Turner and Valentine Families collection(177)

    Photographic portrait of a man in ceremonial robes
    Grandfather Turner. Father of John Turner
    Isla Villa, Mary Street, Dunoon
    Photograph of John Turner
  • Tooloyn Koortakay collection(28)

    Parrangkeeyt - loin ornament
    Meelaywook - woman's upper arm belt
    Morrom - wrist ornament
    Nyarrayt

    The Tooloyn Koortakay Collection comprises thirty pieces including a reproduction of the Maiden's Punt Yorta Yorta possum skin cloak collected in 1853, a reproduction of the Lake Condah Gunditjmara possum skin cloak collected in 1872, pastel drawings, lino cuts, etchings, possum skin dance ornaments and a selection of tools for making possum skin cloaks. As the cloaks were well over one hundred years old and slowly deteriorating, Lee Darroch, Treahna Hamm, Vicki Couzens and Debra Couzens undertook the project as a commitment to cultural regeneration.

    Possum skin cloaks are a significant aspect of Aboriginal cultural heritage from Victoria and other parts of southeastern Australia. Prior to 1830 almost every person had his or her own possum skin cloak to wear during winter and use for a mattress or blanket. Cloaks were incised with designs representing clan identity, animals, plants and natural features. As there are only five cloaks from this region known to exist in the world, the Tooloyn Koortakay collection is an important historical record as well as a significant expression of contemporary cultural change and identity.

  • American-Australian Scientific Expedition to Arnhem Land (AASEAL) collection(218)

    Model coffin log
    Wooden spear with metal blade
    The Milky Way
    The Magellan Clouds
  • Canning Stock Route collection(124)

    'Kumpupirnily' by Billy Atkins, 2008
    'Minyipuru' by Nora Nangapa, 2008
    'Kiriwirri' by Jan Billycan, 2008
    Yakapiri (bark sandals)

    The Canning Stock Route collection is comprised of 125 works and includes paintings, drawings, baskets, boomerangs, coolamons, headdresses, carved figures and shields.

    The Canning Stock Route is a no-longer-used cattle droving route that traverses the Great Sandy and Gibson Deserts of central Western Australia. Comprised of 48 wells along an 1800 kilometres stretch of track, the route links Wiluna in the south with Sturt Creek in the north and traverses the traditional lands of nine Aboriginal language groups. The route was founded in 1905 when Alfred Canning was commissioned to investigate a route suitable for the droving of 500 head of cattle, with water sources spaced at intervals of no more than one day's walk apart. Although Canning's map records observations of the land and water resources, it makes no mention of Indigenous places and their associated meanings which the route traversed. This collection, composed of 'painting stories', sculptural works and oral histories, re-dresses Canning's omission and records the impact of the stock route on Indigenous lives and country. A six week journey with traditional owners held in July and August of 2007 inspired the artworks, many of which were produced during the journey, and provided an opportunity for more than 70 senior and emerging artists to reconnect with traditional lands..

  • Bob Brown collection no. 1(161)

    Protests during the campaign to save the Franklin River.
    Bob Brown with Police officers.
    Protesters and police during the campaign to save the Franklin River.
    Bob Brown rafting down rapids on the Franklin River.

    This collection of approximately 3000 items consists of ephemera, documents and personal artefacts relating to the life and work of Senator (Bob) Robert James Brown, one of Australia's most prominent conservationists and environmental activists. The collection is particularly strong in relation to ephemera from the 'Save the Franklin' campaign of the late 1970s and early 1980s, but also includes some pro-dam ephemera that shows the opposition's point of view. Material from the earlier 'Save Lake Pedder' campaign is also well represented.

    Dr Bob Brown, a medical doctor, rose to prominence in the late 1970s after taking on the directorship of the Tasmanian Wilderness Society (TWS) and becoming one of Australia's most outspoken and high profile opponents of the Tasmanian Hydro Electric Commission's plans to flood the Gordon and Franklin Rivers in Tasmania's largely untamed southwest. Building on the impetus of earlier campaigns against the flooding of Lake Pedder, the TWS was spectacularly successful in galvanising national public opinion against the Gordon and Franklin dam proposal. This reached its zenith with the 'No Dams' campaign that commenced in 1981 and culminated in the July 1983 decision by the High Court of Australia against the construction of the dam. This decision also had broader political and constitutional ramifications because it was seen by some as an undermining of state rights, while others saw it as a milestone in national conservation awareness that underscored the power of environmental issues in national politics.

    As a result of his very public efforts to preserve Australia's natural heritage Dr Bob Brown was made Australian of the Year in 1983, and received the UNEP Global 500 Award 1987, and the Goldman Environmental Prize USA 1990. He was elected as an independent to the Tasmanian House of Assembly in 1983 and has served as a federal senator for the Australian Greens since 1996.

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