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National Museum of Australia

Collection Explorer

4

Collections

  • Josef Lebovic Gallery collection no. 1(7553)

    Tararazuka Hotel, Japan
    Fairy Bower Steps, Bundanoon, 1906
    Margaret Anglin
    Post Office, Orange NSW
  • Enid Treadgold collection(375)

    Black and white promotional photograph of Uncle George of 2GB
    Letter from 'Nephew & Cousin George' to 'Aunty, Uncle & Enid', written at sea on 28 November 1941
    Letter from Nephew & Cousin / George to Aunty, Uncle & Enid, written at sea on 28 November 1941
    From Zeppelin brought down over Hull 1917
  • Helen Eager and Christopher Hodges collection no. 2(43)

    Untitled painting by Lyndsay Bird Mpetyane
    Untitled painting by Lucky Kngwarreye Morton
    Untitled painting by Elsie Tilmouth
    Untitled painting by Louie Pwerle

    This collection consists of works made during the 1990s by artists at the Ngkawenyerre camp in the Utopia homelands, NT. The works are varied in size and media, and in good condition. All works refer to aspects of the 'Awelye' ceremony and feature women's body paint designs. The associated ceremonies are an integral part of community life and the 'Awelye' is performed by women to ensure the fertility of the land, spiritual and physical well-being and social harmony.

    Aboriginal people of the Utopia region have a strong tradition of mark making in a range of media and their work is well represented in museum and art gallery collections in Australia and overseas. These works, collected in the 1990s, are seminal works representing the early transference of ceremonial design from traditional forms and methods of painting to portable two dimensional surfaces for outside audiences. They are historically significant examples of the use of introduced tools and materials such as acrylic paint on canvas and papier mache and wire. The papier mache figures were an experimental form, of which few examples now exist.

  • Neil Jensen collection(72)

    Letter to Mons. F. Rouge from Jean V. Augsburger
    Certificate of Airworthiness for aircraft HB-OFU in Great Britain and Northern Ireland, 1937-1938
    Letter to Light Plane Services from the C.A.A.
    Carbon copy of letter to Rolls Royce seeking information on modifications to engine, 19 March 1980.

    The Neil Jensen collection consists of a Percival Gull Six aircraft, G-AERD, and associated archive. Made by the Percival Aircraft Company at Gravesend in Kent, England, in 1936, this aircraft was first purchased by Ariane Dufaux of Switzerland and registered as HB-OFU. After passing through several owners in Switzerland, the aircraft was sold to a collector and restored by Cliff Lovell in England where it was featured on the air show circuit and registered as G-AERD. Neil Jensen purchased G-AERD in 1983, and while it was based in Redhill, Surrey it was awarded the Percival Trophy by the Cotswold Aircraft Restoration Group.

    Born in Albury, New South Wales, in 1897, Edgar Wikner Percival served in Europe and Egypt with the Royal Flying Corps during the First World War. Returning to Australia after the war, Percival operated a commercial aviation business while pursuing opportunities to design and manufacture new types of aircraft. In 1929, he travelled to England to work as a test pilot for the Bristol Aircraft Company, and in 1930 designed and manufactured the first low-wing cantilever monoplanes in the British Commonwealth. Percival formed the Percival Aircraft Company in 1932 and named the new aircraft series 'Gull'. Characterised by their graceful lines, the Gulls had light wooden frames covered with doped (lacquered) fabric and powerful four or six cylinder engines. PercivalÂ?s Gulls quickly established a reputation for high performance, with Percival designing racing versions named 'Mew Gulls', which won acclaim in the Kings Cup Air Race.

  • Behind the Lines 2007 collection(12)

    Humble pie
    Stop
    The details'll be along later
    Saint Kevin

    The Behind the Lines 2007 collection consists of 68 political cartoons collected under the auspices of the National Museum of Australia's 2005-2007 Political cartooning targeted collecting project and the Behind the Lines 2007 political cartooning exhibition. There are 52 different artists represented in the collection including Alan Moir, Peter Nicholson, Cathy Wilcox, Mark Knight, Sean Leahy, Bruce Petty, Dean Alston and Ward O'Neill.

    The cartoons provide a satirical record of the major events and personalities in Australian politics in 2007. Major topics addressed within the collection include issues such as citizenship testing, the APEC summit, the rise of Kevin Rudd, the continuing conflicts in Afghanistan and Irag and an election year in which the Labour party regained the Federal Leadership. Taken together the collection provides a diverse visual archive of Australian political events in 2007 and demonstrates the quality of Australian political cartooning and illustration.

  • William and Jeanette Derham Family - Bendigo Pottery collection(417)

    Salt glazed brown ceramic demijohn with screw-threaded stopper [Adelaide Chemical & Fertiliser Company Ltd]
    Brown glazed toby jug depicting Sir Donald Bradman with box and certificate
    Ceramic bread crock with lid
    Ceramic jardiniere

    The William and Jeanette Derham family collection is the physical manifestation of Mr Derham's commitment to documenting the work of Bendigo Pottery, its wares and institutional history, as well as the association he and his family had with the business between 1968 and 1983. The collection consists of historic Bendigo Pottery ceramics from the 19th and 20th centuries which illustrate the diversity of wares produced between 1858 and 1971, as well as a comprehensive range of items manufactured during the Derham era. This material is supported by a unique collection of stamps and printing blocks used as part of the manufacturing and advertising processes as well as documentary materials, photographs and ephemera which illustrate working life at Bendigo Pottery.

    Since its establishment in 1858, Bendigo Pottery has played a significant role in the history of Australian ceramics, producing wares ranging from the domestic and decorative, to the utilitarian and industrial. The history of the business illustrates the process of technological transfer in the decorative arts, the adaptation of imported ceramic traditions to local markets and the development of distinctively Australian imagery, styles and pottery products. Bendigo Pottery has provided useful products and employment opportunities to the community for 150 years and on an aesthetic level ensured that the skills of the potter, which so easily could have been lost with the advent of mass production techniques, have been preserved for posterity.

  • J Davidson collection no. 3(319)

    Opossum Tree  Dreaming.
    Painting depicts 11 human figures and 2 wallabies
    Gupupuyngu mortuary rites.
    Bark painting depicting Macassan parangs by Mawalan Marika, Yirrkala, 1965
  • Springfield - Faithfull Family collection(3501)

    Handwritten note with a list of scores or money, numbers and names
    The Tourist.
    Clare Wilkinson
    Pencil sketch depicting a bridge and a human figure riding a donkey

    The Springfield Collection comprises about 1550 artefacts from Springfield station, south of Goulburn. It includes colonial era costume, a bushranger medal, surveying instruments, a late-19th century landau, firearms and edged weapons, wool samples and Joseph Foveaux's pocket watch and bible. The objects are complemented by over 400 photographs. This diverse collection reflects the growth and economic success of the property, responses to changes in the wool market and the daily lives of the people who have lived on Springfield.

    Springfield has grown from a 518-hectare land grant given to William Pitt Faithfull in 1828 to the current 3183 hectares with ownership remaining in the one family. William Pitt Faithfull established the Springfield Merino Stud in 1838 with ten rams selected from the Macarthur Camden Park stud. The stud evolved slowly over the years until the early 1950s when, under the management of Jim Maple-Brown, a scientific approach to wool-growing was adopted and the stud's name was changed to Fonthill to reflect this.

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