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National Museum of Australia

Collection Explorer

4

Collections

  • Petronella Wensing collection no. 1(229)

    Pattern for knitting machine
    Envelope addressed to Petronella Wensing
    Certificate
    Certificate
  • Josef Lebovic Gallery collection no. 1(7553)

    Farm Cove, Sydney
    This is wattle protect us
    The Dash for the South Pole
    Soldiers Memorial Hall, Yass
  • Ben Chifley collection no. 3(53)

    Four letters of condolence to Mrs Clark and two photographs
    Prime ministerial correspondence
    Invitation to Mrs Chifley, to a State Ball in honour of the Elizabeth, the Queen Mother
    Cec Burgness Fund

    The objects in the Ben Chifley Collection refer to the lives of Ben and Elizabeth Chifley, primarily from the Chifleys' days as Prime Minister and Prime Minister's wife, but stretching beyond Ben's death in 1951 until Elizabeth's death in 1962. Significant objects include a letter of condolence to Elizabeth Chifley from Elsie Curtin (former PM John Curtin's wife) on the death of Ben Chifley (above), photos of Chifley as a young boy and a bible on which Chifley was sworn in as minister in the short-lived Scullin government of 1931.

    Joseph Benedict Chifley was Australia's sixteenth Prime Minister, leading the Australian government between 1945 and 1949. This period was one of particular importance in Australian history, being the time during which many of the contours of post-War Australian social and economic development were established. Chifley also articulated the values of the reforming Labor Party in his "Light on the Hill" speech of 1949. However, the election of December that year saw the beginning of a drastic re-alignment of political allegiances in voting behaviour, leading to over twenty years of conservative dominance in Australian politics. An understanding of Ben Chifley, in both his private and public guises, illustrates much about this crucial era in post-War Australian history.

  • Matthew Flinders collection(4)

    Terra Australis or Australia, the Parts Explored Bewteen 1798 and 1803 by Matthew Flinders
    Matthew Flinders' 'A Voyage to Terra Australis' (1814), Volume 1
    Stream anchor from Matthew Flinders' ship the 'Investigator'
    Matthew Flinders' 'A Voyage to Terra Australis' (1814) , Volume 2

    The Matthew Flinders Collection comprises one copy of Matthew Flinders (1814, London) A Voyage to Terra Australia comprising two volumes of text plus an atlas. The text traces the coastal exploration of Australia to 1803 whilst the charts in the atlas represent the state of British knowledge of the Australian coastline in 1810-11. The text volumes and atlas were purchased from the collection of Kevin Crotty at an Australian Book Auctions auction.

    Matthew Flinders (1774-1814) was an accomplished navigator who served in Australian waters from 1795 to 1803, engaged mostly on coastal survey work. His most notable achievements were to demonstrate that Van Diemen's Land was not part of New South Wales and that New Holland and New south Wales were part of one continental mass. Flinders is generally acknowledged as the first to use the term 'Australia' to name that continent.

  • David Westcott collection no. 6(22)

    Embroidered silk postcard from World War One
    Certificate
    Embroidered silk postcard from World War One
    Certificate

    The Bradman, World War One and agricultural collection (David Westcott) consists of five World War One silk postcards; six 19th century agricultural show prizes; eight "Japanese invasion money" notes from the Netherlands East Indies; one book on Donald Bradman (1948).

    With the separation caused by overseas service during World War One, postcards became an important way to reduce the pain of absence for those at the front and those at home. Silk postcards, initially hand-made in France but later mass produced, were a popular souvenir to send home. The Japanese Government authorised various printings of so-called "invasion money" to equate approximately with each occupied country's pre-war currency. After Japanese forces were defeated, the Allies destroyed all known "invasion money" issues, but many examples were souvenired by servicemen. The agricultural show certificates provide and important link into the agricultural economy of Federation-era Australia (in particularly the Victoria-New South Wales border). The book on Donald Bradman was written by journalist and selector AG Moyes. Moyes was a State selector who helped bring Bradman into top class cricket. He was clearly a great admirer of Bradman, as well as a friend. The book is an example of the development of the Bradman legend at a key moment in "The Don's" career.

  • Neil Jensen collection(72)

    Letter to Mons. F. Rouge from Jean V. Augsburger
    Compass Swing Record carried out for C of A renewal
    Voucher for half-bottle of wine in honour of the Queen's Silver Jubilee
    Weight and Centre of Gravity Schedule for G-AERD, 16 March 1980

    The Neil Jensen collection consists of a Percival Gull Six aircraft, G-AERD, and associated archive. Made by the Percival Aircraft Company at Gravesend in Kent, England, in 1936, this aircraft was first purchased by Ariane Dufaux of Switzerland and registered as HB-OFU. After passing through several owners in Switzerland, the aircraft was sold to a collector and restored by Cliff Lovell in England where it was featured on the air show circuit and registered as G-AERD. Neil Jensen purchased G-AERD in 1983, and while it was based in Redhill, Surrey it was awarded the Percival Trophy by the Cotswold Aircraft Restoration Group.

    Born in Albury, New South Wales, in 1897, Edgar Wikner Percival served in Europe and Egypt with the Royal Flying Corps during the First World War. Returning to Australia after the war, Percival operated a commercial aviation business while pursuing opportunities to design and manufacture new types of aircraft. In 1929, he travelled to England to work as a test pilot for the Bristol Aircraft Company, and in 1930 designed and manufactured the first low-wing cantilever monoplanes in the British Commonwealth. Percival formed the Percival Aircraft Company in 1932 and named the new aircraft series 'Gull'. Characterised by their graceful lines, the Gulls had light wooden frames covered with doped (lacquered) fabric and powerful four or six cylinder engines. Percival's Gulls quickly established a reputation for high performance, with Percival designing racing versions named 'Mew Gulls', which won acclaim in the Kings Cup Air Race.

  • Dr Herbert Basedow collection(424)

    Glass plate negative - Sand deposited between kitchen and meat house during a single sandstorm, Miranda Station, South Australia, photographed by Herbert Basedow, 1919
    Glass plate negative - Women's camp fight, photographed by Herbert Basedow
    Glass plate negative - Expedition party crossing a clay flat, north-west of Gill's Bluff, South Australia, photographed by Herbert Basedow, 1919
    Lantern slide - Pitjantjatjara men wearing wooden hair ornaments known as 'elenba', central Australia, photographed by Herbert Basedow, 1920-1924
  • Professor Peter Spearritt collection no. 2(185)

    Charles & Diana
    Chuck and Di have a Baby
    It'll grow back. Save our forrests. No Woodchips
    Mickey Mouse Weekly - Souvenir Coronation issue, 1953

    The Professor Peter Spearritt collection No. 2 is divided into four categories; British Royal Family memorabilia, Australian Republic Movement material, T-shirts with Indigenous motifs and anti-logging material. The British Royal Family memorabilia category predominantly relates to Queen Elizabeth II's 1954 tour of Australia. The items were specifically collected by the vendor for the 1993 exhibition entitled Australians and the Monarchy. The Australian Republic Movement material was also featured in this exhibition. The Indigenous motifs T-shirts and the anti-logging material were collected for the 1992 exhibition Lie of the Land. Both exhibitions were jointly created by the Powerhouse Museum, Sydney and the National Centre for Australian Studies at Monash University. Professor Spearritt was the head curator of both exhibitions.

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