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National Museum of Australia

Collection Explorer

4

Collections

  • Neil Jensen collection(72)

    Letter from Percival Aircraft Co. to Mons. F. Dufaux
    Advice Note from Hants & Sussex Aviation Ltd
    Letter to Mons. F. Rouge from Jean V. Augsburger
    Preliminary Inspection Report from Light Plane Services, 30 April 1981-6 May 1981

    The Neil Jensen collection consists of a Percival Gull Six aircraft, G-AERD, and associated archive. Made by the Percival Aircraft Company at Gravesend in Kent, England, in 1936, this aircraft was first purchased by Ariane Dufaux of Switzerland and registered as HB-OFU. After passing through several owners in Switzerland, the aircraft was sold to a collector and restored by Cliff Lovell in England where it was featured on the air show circuit and registered as G-AERD. Neil Jensen purchased G-AERD in 1983, and while it was based in Redhill, Surrey it was awarded the Percival Trophy by the Cotswold Aircraft Restoration Group.

    Born in Albury, New South Wales, in 1897, Edgar Wikner Percival served in Europe and Egypt with the Royal Flying Corps during the First World War. Returning to Australia after the war, Percival operated a commercial aviation business while pursuing opportunities to design and manufacture new types of aircraft. In 1929, he travelled to England to work as a test pilot for the Bristol Aircraft Company, and in 1930 designed and manufactured the first low-wing cantilever monoplanes in the British Commonwealth. Percival formed the Percival Aircraft Company in 1932 and named the new aircraft series 'Gull'. Characterised by their graceful lines, the Gulls had light wooden frames covered with doped (lacquered) fabric and powerful four or six cylinder engines. PercivalÂ?s Gulls quickly established a reputation for high performance, with Percival designing racing versions named 'Mew Gulls', which won acclaim in the Kings Cup Air Race.

  • Timothy Millett collection(314)

    Convict love token from W.G., 1837
    Convict love token from Edward Hawkins, 1834
    Convict love token from D. Greenfield, 1833
    Convict love token inscribed with the initials R.L and S.L., 1819

    The Timothy Millett collection comprises 307 convict love tokens dating from 1762 to 1856, and seven contemporary documents relating to the criminal justice system including: recommendations to commute the death sentences of Hester Sampson and Thomas Hayes to life transportation; a calendar of prisoners awaiting trial in the goals of Durham, Newcastle and Northumberland; a request to the Middlesex assizes for rewards to be paid; a printed copy of George Skene's last speech prior to execution; a printed broadside listing prisoners in Dorchester jail awaiting transportation; and a 60 page handwritten account of the life of Thomas Jones, who was transported twice and finally hanged at Winchester Prison in 1856.

    Convict love tokens, typically made from smoothed-down coins and engraved or stippled with a message, derive from traditional sailors' farewells. The production of these 'leaden hearts' rose as criminal indictments increased in Britain, with the majority produced during the 1820s and 1830s. As mementos made by or for convicts facing transportation (or death) to leave behind for their loved ones, the tokens provide a poignant, personal insight into the transportation system.

  • John Collinson Close collection(26)

    Registered envelope addressed to J H Collinson Close, Mosman, NSW
    Five loose pages of diary with entries by John Close, 1912
    Handwritten poem titled Crossing the Bar, by Lord Alfred Tennyson
    Three page folded letter from John Close to Alice Close, Antarctica 1911

    This collection comprises objects belonging to John Henry Collinson Close, a member of the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) of 1911-1914, led by Dr Douglas Mawson. It includes a telescope and case; pocket compass; Bryant and May matchbox (used to keep Close's Morse code); diary entries and letters from Close to his wife Alice (three on AAE letterhead); a hand-stitched canvas pouch with a label written by Close in ink, containing two rock samples collected in Antarctica and sent to Alice by supply ship in 1912; a copy of Life Magazine from September 1914; newspaper cuttings of eight articles written by or referencing Close; three typescript letters, including correspondence from Douglas Mawson; handwritten copies of two poems, including one by Tennyson; a newspaper cutting of a Douglas Stewart poem; and a registered envelope addressed to Close.

    The John Collinson Close collection dates from the 'heroic era' of Antarctic exploration, perhaps the last great period of geographical discovery on Earth. It demonstrates key events in a story that led to Australia's claim over 42% of the continent. Linked to this story, and to this collection, are simultaneous ties to the old notions of Empire and the assertion of a new national identity. Close's private letters and journalism reveal the contrast between the personal experiences of a lesser-known expeditioner and a venture, overshadowed by a mythologised leader, now abstracted into the national memory and imagination.

  • Josef Lebovic Gallery collection no. 1(7553)

    Public School and Residence, Laggan
    The Blow Hole, Eaglehawk Neck
    Union Hotel, Trundle
    Sacred Heart Convent, Rose Bay N.S.W.
  • Springfield Merino Stud collection(166)

    Commodore 3 years
    Certificate awarded at the Murrumbidgee Annual Show, 1886, Second Prize
    Special Prize card awarded at the Murrumbidgee Annual Show, Wagga Wagga, 1887
  • Liesl Rockchild collection(68)

    Horse and Cowboy 1998
    Horses and Cowboy 1997,1999
    Camel, Rider and Pack Camel
    Horse and Cowboy 1999

    This collection contains sixty-eight bush toys commissioned for the Bush Toys exhibition and created from 1997 to 1999. The workd were made by evelven emerging and established artists from three Eastern Arrente communities from Central Australia. Ă‚? Tristan Young, Calvin Smith, Christopher Wallace and Douglas Wallace, Ltyentye Apurte (Santa Teresa Mission); David Wallace and Johnny Young from Titjikala (Maryvale Station); Lindsay James, Clifford Tilmouth, Davey Tilmouth, Maxi Wehr and Michael Wehr from Engawala (Alcoota Station). Prior to their acquisition by the Museum, these works were exhibited as Bush Toys at a number of venues in rural and remote Australia.

    The objects are made from found and salvaged materials and are based on the toys that they either used or made as children and still make for their children or in Tristan Young's case still make and play with. Aboriginal communities have always produced toys for their children as teaching tools to prepare them for adulthood. Historically these were miniature versions of implements and utensils that were essential for daily survival such as toy spears, toy shields and toy boomerangs. Since the introduction of new materials like metal, plastic and glass, these toys have evolved to reflect the environment and lifestyle of the makers. Since the 1970s when many of the adults became involved in working on cattle stations, some of the toys modelled a horse and rider, some incorporated scenes of stockmen, stockyards and rodeos. Over time toys reflected changing technology in use on cattle stations. Trucks, motorbikes, helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft were made.

  • Aboriginal Arts Board collection no. 2(561)

    Painting depicts  X-ray style kangaroo
    Stone with incised Wandjina figures
    'Snake Dreaming at Naruingya', by Yumpuluru Tjungurrayi, 1976
    Bark painting depicting a totemic crocodile by Yirawala, Croker Island, 1965
  • Everitt and George Family collection(911)

    The Toy Theatre
    Film-script titled 'Penny Plain, Twopence Coloured'
    Handwritten document, listing stage movements for characters in the play 'The Silver Palace'
    Toy theatre play booklet, scenery and figures for 'The Sleeping Beauty'

    The Everitt and George Family collection consists of over 800 objects including a Toy Theatre with a 'Redington' proscenium and a second back stage, play booklets and associated scenery, photographs of the Toy Theatre, and documents and working notes related to the collection. The collection is in good condition.

    The Toy Theatre was invented in England around 1811, reflecting the popularity of pantomimes and plays performed in the leading theatres around London in the same period. They soon became a favourite pastime for teenage boys and adult collectors alike, with a long list of publishers producing a wealth of material. B Pollock was one of the most famous of these publishers and the earliest pieces in this collection have been attributed to Pollock. Though this was largely an English tradition the collection reflects the first owner Edward Everitt's heritage, who migrated to Australia in the 19th century bringing parts of the Toy Theatre with him.

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