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National Museum of Australia

Collection Explorer

4

Collections

  • Captain Cook Plane Table Frame collection(3)

    Plane table frame used by Captain James Cook
    Letter of thanks from London Exhibitions Ltd, 1905
    Exhibition loan receipt for Captain Cook's Chart Rule, 1905

    This collection consists of a magnifier on a tortoiseshell mount housed in a silver case, a surveyor's plane table frame with rule and square protractor, in a boxwood frame with brass hinges measuring 34.2 x 41.1 cm., and a pair of late 18th century embroidered maps of the Eastern and Western hemispheres on silk backed with cotton and showing the tracks of Captain Cook's three Pacific voyages, 34.3 cm in diameter.

    Each of these three objects attests to the significance of Captain James Cook and his voyages in the British, and subsequently the Australian imagination. The magnifier and plane table frame are excellent examples of the passion for Cook relics which begins at the sale before the mast of his effects and continues to the present day. The plane table frame's exhibition in the 1905 London exhibition (documented by a receipt and letter included in the lot) marks its role in the evolving portrayal of Cook as an imperial hero. The magnifier documents the role of William Bayly, assistant to the Astronomer Royal, who sailed on the second and third of Cook's voyages, and visited Australia twice. The embroidered maps are a very personal celebration of Cook, and a reminder of the limited avenues for expressing devotion available to the women who waited at home for their men to return from dangerous voyages.

  • MJ Brown collection(5)

    Hexagonal-shaped smoking pipe bowl, carved from dark wood used by Ben Chifley
    Paper insert for tobacco tin used by Ben Chifley
    State Express Ready Rubbed Virginia Tobacco Ardath Fine Cut tobacco tin used by Ben Chifley
    Smoking pipe mouthpiece used by Ben Chifley

    The M J Brown collection contains five objects related to former Australian Prime Minister, Joseph Benedict (Ben) Chifley (1885-1951). The collection includes a felt "squatter" style Akubra gardening hat, hexagonal wooden smoking pipe bowl, smoking pipe mouthpiece, State Express tobacco tin and detachable paper lining for tobacco tin. The items were donated for inclusion in the National Historical Collection by Queensland amateur historian, Mr Michael John Brown, who presented them to Prime Minister Malcolm Fraser at Lennon's Hotel, Brisbane, on 5th June, 1980.

    Ben Chifley, Australia's 16th Prime Minister, and one of Australia's best-known leaders, was born in Bathurst, NSW. Though his early years were ones of hardship, he went on to become AustraliaÂ?s youngest first-class locomotive driver, union delegate and worker's advocate. Elected to Parliament in 1928, he became Prime Minister following John Curtin's death in July 1945. Chifley's achievements include establishing the Snowy Mountains Scheme, the founding of ASIO, the Australian National University and Australia's post-war immigration program, the establishment of Trans-Australian Airways (TAA), as well as key social reforms including the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme, the first Commonwealth-State Housing Agreement and the Commonwealth Employment Service. Chifley led the Federal Parliamentary Labor Party till his death in 1951,and remains an icon of the Australian Labor Party. The objects in this collection are a record of Chifley as most people knew him - a humble and "unpretentious" man, and an "average Australian bloke". Biographical sources reveal that Chifley seldom used his ministerial car, preferring instead to walk, and knew most staff by their first names. According to an interview with Chifley and his wife Elizabeth, conducted by the Australian Women's Weekly in 1945, gardening was among Chifley's favourite hobbies, although his duties in Canberra rarely allowed time for this activity, nor for relaxing with his trademark pipe and newspaper by the fire at his Bathurst home.

  • Springfield - Faithfull Family collection(3501)

    Handwritten note with a list of scores or money, numbers and names
    Vertically-aligned rectangular brown medal presentation case with gold border around the edge of the lid
    Page two of Jim Maple Brown's speech at his wedding
    William Percy Faithfull, George Ernest Faithfull, Reginald Faithfull, Henry Montague Faithfull.

    The Springfield Collection comprises about 1550 artefacts from Springfield station, south of Goulburn. It includes colonial era costume, a bushranger medal, surveying instruments, a late-19th century landau, firearms and edged weapons, wool samples and Joseph Foveaux's pocket watch and bible. The objects are complemented by over 400 photographs. This diverse collection reflects the growth and economic success of the property, responses to changes in the wool market and the daily lives of the people who have lived on Springfield.

    Springfield has grown from a 518-hectare land grant given to William Pitt Faithfull in 1828 to the current 3183 hectares with ownership remaining in the one family. William Pitt Faithfull established the Springfield Merino Stud in 1838 with ten rams selected from the Macarthur Camden Park stud. The stud evolved slowly over the years until the early 1950s when, under the management of Jim Maple-Brown, a scientific approach to wool-growing was adopted and the stud's name was changed to Fonthill to reflect this.

  • Charles Hart collection(489)

    Armband
    Armband
    Mourning disc
    Mourning disc
  • Josef Lebovic Gallery collection no. 1(7553)

    Milford Sound NZ: Terror Peak
    Parish Hall, Linton
    The Convict Ship
    Federation style, two storey house with verandas and garden
  • History of Netball - Margaret Pewtress collection(68)

    WNBBAV A Grade Runners- Up, Autumn 1960 won by Aberfeldie
    VWBBA A Grade Runners- Up 1959 won by Melbourne Blue
    VWBBA A Grade Premiership 1957 - Melbourne Red
    Second World Netball Tournament Australia 1967

    The History of Netball collection consists of material relating to the history of national and
    international level netball in Australia from the 1930s to the present day. The collection of thirty three
    objects has been formed through donations by seven separate donors representing different eras and
    roles in netball history.

    Sport has always been a large part of Australian life and Australians have always enjoyed success on
    the international sporting arena. Australian women in particular have consistently been high achievers
    in international sporting events and netball is one sport where this has been proven repeatedly. The sport evolved and developed in Commonwealth Countries in the early 1900s. In Australia this resulted in a unique local style and a strong Australian contribution to international rules and standards of play. Netball enjoys the third highest participant rate among all sports played in Australia, is the most popular women's sport and is enjoyed both in the country and the city.

  • Papunya Art 2008 collection(15)

    Pencil drawing in Papunya style by Uta Uta Tjangala, Pintupi, 1971
    Pencil and watercolour, on paper in Papunya style by unknown Pintupi artist, 1971
    Untitled painting by Anatjari Tjakamarra, 1972, polymer on board
    Snake Dreaming for Children by  Uta Uta Tjangala, 1972  polymer on board

    The Papunya Art 2008 Collection consists of fifteen artworks, comprising eleven untitled watercolours and drawings on paper produced by Pintupi artists in 1971, 'Goanna Corroboree at Mirkantji' painted on plywood by Kaapa Tjampitjinpa in 1971, 'Snake Dreaming for Children' painted on particle board by Uta Uta Tjangala in 1971, an untitled work painted on wooden board by Anatjari Tjakamarra in 1972, and an untitled work on linen by Uta Uta Tjangala painted in 1986. It also includes some supporting documentation held in the Archive collection.

    The works in this collection are all significant Indigenous works, representing different stages and some of the major artists involved in the development of the Western Desert art movement at Papunya, which has become internationally renowned as the origin of the contemporary Aboriginal acrylic painting industry. The fourteen works from 1971 and 1972 represent the very earliest phase of the movement at Papunya. The eleven watercolours and drawings on paper , three attributed to Uta Uta Tjangala, represent a formative moment in this movement when artists began experimenting with different media.The sketching of designs on paper took place prior to the production of acrylic paintings. Although the designs themselves had been produced traditionally by the artists as body decoration, ground and cave paintings, when Papunya school teacher Geoffrey Bardon supplied the Pintupi men with paper, watercolour and pencil, this was the first time their designs had been applied to a non-traditional surface. Kaapa Tjampitjinpa, Uta Uta Tjangala and Anatjari Tjakamarra were all important artists who contributed to the birth and subsequent development of the Papunya painting movement. The three paintings on boards in this collection, done during 1971 and 1972, therefore enhance the Museum's holdings of significant works from this early period. The 1986 Uta Uta Tjangala painting is also a significant addition to the NMA's growing holdings of this important artist. Overall, the items in this collection are significant in expanding the chronological sweep of the NMA's holdings of Papunya related material, beyond its current strengths in the 1974-1981 period.

  • Embroidered Map Samplers collection(3)

    Pair of maps that indicate the routes of Captain James Cook's three voyages
    Circular silk sampler map of the eastern hemisphere that indicate the routes of Captain James Cook's three voyages
    Circular silk sampler map of the western hemisphere that indicate the routes of Captain James Cook's three voyages

    This collection consists of a magnifier on a tortoiseshell mount housed in a silver case, a surveyor's plane table frame with rule and square protractor, in a boxwood frame with brass hinges measuring 34.2 x 41.1 cm., and a pair of late 18th century embroidered maps of the Eastern and Western hemispheres on silk backed with cotton and showing the tracks of Captain Cook's three Pacific voyages, 34.3 cm in diameter.

    Each of these three objects attests to the significance of Captain James Cook and his voyages in the British, and subsequently the Australian imagination. The magnifier and plane table frame are excellent examples of the passion for Cook relics which begins at the sale before the mast of his effects and continues to the present day. The plane table frame's exhibition in the 1905 London exhibition (documented by a receipt and letter included in the lot) marks its role in the evolving portrayal of Cook as an imperial hero. The magnifier documents the role of William Bayly, assistant to the Astronomer Royal, who sailed on the second and third of Cook's voyages, and visited Australia twice. The embroidered maps are a very personal celebration of Cook, and a reminder of the limited avenues for expressing devotion available to the women who waited at home for their men to return from dangerous voyages.

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