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National Museum of Australia

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Collection Explorer

4

Collections

  • Springfield - Faithfull Family collection(3501)

    Exercise book containing reports on religious sermons
    By Nelson's Column 1897: Some Folks Who Have Done Their Duty
    8017 L'express du Simplon
    School report

    The Springfield Collection comprises about 1550 artefacts from Springfield station, south of Goulburn. It includes colonial era costume, a bushranger medal, surveying instruments, a late-19th century landau, firearms and edged weapons, wool samples and Joseph Foveaux's pocket watch and bible. The objects are complemented by over 400 photographs. This diverse collection reflects the growth and economic success of the property, responses to changes in the wool market and the daily lives of the people who have lived on Springfield.

    Springfield has grown from a 518-hectare land grant given to William Pitt Faithfull in 1828 to the current 3183 hectares with ownership remaining in the one family. William Pitt Faithfull established the Springfield Merino Stud in 1838 with ten rams selected from the Macarthur Camden Park stud. The stud evolved slowly over the years until the early 1950s when, under the management of Jim Maple-Brown, a scientific approach to wool-growing was adopted and the stud's name was changed to Fonthill to reflect this.

  • Josef Lebovic Gallery collection no. 1(7551)

    White Horse Point & Drummoyne from Balmain
    Scene in the Zoo, Sydney
    Sydney Hospital, N.S.W
    In the Fitzroy Gardens, Melbourne
  • Bob Brown collection no. 1(161)

    Bob Brown's life jacket, 1976-1981
    Note with jumper depicting the wild rivers logo by the Tasmanian Wilderness Society.
    Protests during the campaign to save the Franklin River.
    Bob Brown rafting down rapids on the Franklin River.

    This collection of approximately 3000 items consists of ephemera, documents and personal artefacts relates to the life and work of Senator (Bob) Robert James Brown, one of Australia's most prominent conservationists and environmental activists. The collection is particularly strong in relation to ephemera from the 'Save the Franklin' campaign of the late 1970s and early 1980s, but also includes some pro-dam ephemera that shows the opposition's point of view. Material from the earlier 'Save Lake Pedder' campaign is also well represented.

    Dr Bob Brown, a medical doctor, rose to prominence in the late 1970s after taking on the directorship of the Tasmanian Wilderness Society (TWS) and becoming one of Australia's most outspoken and high profile opponents of the Tasmanian Hydro Electric Commission's plans to flood the Gordon and Franklin Rivers in Tasmania's largely untamed southwest. Building on the impetus of earlier campaigns against the flooding of Lake Pedder, the TWS was spectacularly successful in galvanising national public opinion against the Gordon and Franklin dam proposal. This reached its zenith with the 'No Dams' campaign that commenced in 1981 and culminated in the July 1983 decision by the High Court of Australia against the construction of the dam. This decision also had broader political and constitutional ramifications because it was seen by some as an undermining of state rights, while others saw it as a milestone in national conservation awareness that underscored the power of environmental issues in national politics.

    As a result of his very public efforts to preserve Australia's natural heritage Dr Bob Brown was made Australian of the Year in 1983, and received the UNEP Global 500 Award 1987, and the Goldman Environmental Prize USA 1990. He was elected as an independent to the Tasmanian House of Assembly in 1983 and has served as a federal senator for the Australian Greens since 1996.

  • People's Paraphernalia collection no. 8(6)

    War Relief fundraising certificate issued to May Knowles in 1944
    Invitation to the Returning Officer for Williamstown, Mr F.H. Bolton & Lady, in the Exhibition Building, Melbourne, Thursday 9th May 1901, to witness the Opening of the Parliament of the Commonwealth
    Invitation from the Government of Victoria to Mr Bolton and Lady to attend the Royal Review at Flemington on 10 May 1901
    Invitation to a Conversazione at Exhibition Building, Melbourne, 1901
  • Beth Dean Carell collection no. 2(78)

    Pen and ink drawing on transparent paper of Beth Dean in an aboriginal dance
    Sketch of Beth Dean in a seated dance pose wearing an orange-brown costume with white swirls, [5 min Sketch by Bill Constable 1950]
    Sketch of Beth Dean in a seated dance pose wearing an orange-brown costume with white swirls, [5 min Sketch by Bill Constable 1950]
    Kangaroo Man costume

    The Beth Dean-Carrell archive and collections 1, 2 and 3 comprise a vast array of costumes, photographs, tapes, videos, documents and letters relating to the development, choreography and staging of a number of ballets dealing with Aboriginal myths and legends, including Corroboree, Kurdaitcha and The First Boomerang. As well, the collections contain a large number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, Pacific Islander (e.g. Cook Islands and New Zealand) and Papua New Guinean cultural objects.

    An early concern for, and appreciation of Aboriginal culture, led dancer, choreographer and writer, Beth Dean, and her husband singer, writer and film maker, Victor Carell, to spend several months researching dance in Aboriginal societies in the Northern Territory in 1953, and later, in the Pacific Islands and Papua New Guinea. Their research was assisted by anthropologists such as A. P. Elkin, T.G.H. Strehlow and C. P. Mountford and by traditional elders. Although based on cultural values and customary costume, Dean's ballet performances were interpretations, rather than literal representations, of Aboriginal ceremonial dances. Dean's was the second stage version of Corroboree in 1954, which was set to composer John Antill's musical score, Corroboree, which he completed in 1946. Antill was inspired to incorporate Aboriginal rhythm and melody into symphonic music following meetings with Aboriginal communities at La Perouse in Sydney. Both Dean's and Antill's productions reflected a post- World War II national trend by Australian composers and choreographers towards an intentional Australian cultural identity or national style which incorporated either actual or impressionistic interpretations of Aboriginal music, dance and culture. It is ironic, nonetheless, that Aboriginal people at that time were not considered to be Australian citizens, lacked many basic human rights, and were largely absent, not only from the lives of most urban white Australians, but from the concert performances through which only selective versions of their culture were portrayed. However, while these performances would be considered unacceptable today, Beth Dean's intention was not to further marginalize Aboriginal people but to sensitively and considerately convey to Australian audiences "the ethics, wisdomÂ?discipline [and] harmony of Aboriginal customs and culture.

  • E Redlich collection(24)

    Letter
    Price list from Hermannsburg Mission, 1961
    Letter
    The Way of Life
  • Timothy Millett collection(313)

    Convict love token from Thomas King
    Convict love token from W. Mollet., 1843
    Convict love token from William Hancock, 1832
    Convict love token engraved with the initials J.D., 1825

    The Timothy Millett collection comprises 307 convict love tokens dating from 1762 to 1856, and seven contemporary documents relating to the criminal justice system including: recommendations to commute the death sentences of Hester Sampson and Thomas Hayes to life transportation; a calendar of prisoners awaiting trial in the goals of Durham, Newcastle and Northumberland; a request to the Middlesex assizes for rewards to be paid; a printed copy of George Skene's last speech prior to execution; a printed broadside listing prisoners in Dorchester jail awaiting transportation; and a 60 page handwritten account of the life of Thomas Jones, who was transported twice and finally hanged at Winchester Prison in 1856.

    Convict love tokens, typically made from smoothed-down coins and engraved or stippled with a message, derive from traditional sailors' farewells. The production of these 'leaden hearts' rose as criminal indictments increased in Britain, with the majority produced during the 1820s and 1830s. As mementos made by or for convicts facing transportation (or death) to leave behind for their loved ones, the tokens provide a poignant, personal insight into the transportation system.

  • Jack Heenan collection(25)

    Holden Torana tiepin
    Cartoon related to General Motors Holden employee Jack Heenan and Holden cars
    GMH General Motors-Holden's 25 Year Club 1977
    Holden Torana tiepin

    The Jack Heenan collection comprises memorabilia, artwork, clothing accessories and industry journals relating to the career of Jack Heenan who worked for General Motors Holden (GMH) from 1935 until his retirement in 1974. He began his career working in forecasting, but later transferred to the sales department. These objects were used by Mr Heenan in his daily working life.

    GMH has played an important role in the history of Australian motor transport. The early model Holdens (the FX and FJ) are among the most recognisable cultural artefacts of 1950s and 1960s Australia. Motoring memorabilia illustrates the passionate connection some people feel towards motoring and Holden cars. The creation of marketing symbols as functional and collectible items also demonstrates the nature of Holden's powerful marketing campaigns. This collection of objects also traces the evolution of Australia's motoring history, Holden's own sense of its history and connection to post-war development, and Holden's continuing prominence in the popular imagination.

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