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National Museum of Australia

Collection Explorer

4

Collections

  • Josef Lebovic Gallery collection no. 1(7553)

    Mount View
    Raising the Japanese Midget Submarine
    Postcard depicting Bland Holt
    Darlinghurst Rd. Kings Cross. Sydney
  • Springfield Merino Stud collection(166)

    Certificate awarded at the Murrumbidgee Annual Show, 1887, First Prize
    Certificate awarded at the Murrumbidgee Annual Show, 1886, Second Prize
    Champion Prize card awarded at the Murrumbidgee Annual Show, 1887
    Wool sample box
  • Bali Bombings 2002 Memorial - Parliament of Victoria collection(49)

    Helping Hand
    Love and Peace Forever
    Condolence card from the Cornford family to the victims of the Bali bombings
    October 2002 12th Sat

    The Bali Bombings 2002 Memorial Collection - Parliament of Victoria collection is a small sample of the large amount of material left on the Victorian Parliamentary steps in the two weeks following the Bali bombing on 12 October 2002. The collection is made up of cards, letters, various paintings by children, wooden Catholic cross with fabric lei, wooden sculpture of a Balinese surfer carrying a surfboard, soft toys such as butterflies, soft koala teddy bears, dolls and football, two small Australian flags, small pieces of jewellery, some textile objects such as a satin throw and fabric flowers, vegemite jar, a 'In Memory' book signed by the members of the Ivanhoe Grammar School and community and a bound collection of children's drawings and letters from the students of Penleigh and Essendon Grammar schools.

    Late on the evening of Saturday 12 October 2002, two bombs exploded in the crowded Paddy's Bar and the Sari nightclub on Jalan Legian, Kuta Beach, Bali, Indonesia. Shortly afterwards a third bomb exploded at the US consulate in Denpassar, Bali. Exact figures were difficult to substantiate, but at least 202 people were killed in the first two blasts and over 300 injured. Of the two hundred or more dead, eighty-eight were Australians. The deadly attacks produced profound shock in Australia. For many, this event seemed to bring home the immediacy of global terrorism, which had come to public prominence the previous year in New York and Washington.

  • Springfield - Faithfull Family collection(3501)

    Sir Ernest Cable's property, Devo
    Prince of Wales
    Phyllis Boydell (nee Harrisl) - portrait by Cazneaux
    Envelope addressed to Dame Pattie Menzies, GBE

    The Springfield Collection comprises about 1550 artefacts from Springfield station, south of Goulburn. It includes colonial era costume, a bushranger medal, surveying instruments, a late-19th century landau, firearms and edged weapons, wool samples and Joseph Foveaux's pocket watch and bible. The objects are complemented by over 400 photographs. This diverse collection reflects the growth and economic success of the property, responses to changes in the wool market and the daily lives of the people who have lived on Springfield.

    Springfield has grown from a 518-hectare land grant given to William Pitt Faithfull in 1828 to the current 3183 hectares with ownership remaining in the one family. William Pitt Faithfull established the Springfield Merino Stud in 1838 with ten rams selected from the Macarthur Camden Park stud. The stud evolved slowly over the years until the early 1950s when, under the management of Jim Maple-Brown, a scientific approach to wool-growing was adopted and the stud's name was changed to Fonthill to reflect this.

  • Dr Helen M Wurm collection no. 5(60)

    Maraiin
    Bark painting 'A mam or namandi spirit in Margolidjban' by Dick Nguleingulei Murrumurru, Gunbalanya, 1968
    Emu.
    Emu & Snake, painted on a tea chest lid by Johnny Bamagal.
  • Dot Butler collection no. 1(3)

    Billy can
    Billy can
    Dot Butler's backpack
  • Ken Ross collection(20)

    1 Mile Country Championship 1926 winner's medal
    1/4 Mile Australasian Championship 1926 - 2nd place medal
    Goulburn to Sydney 1928 sash
    Bathurst to Sydney 1927 - Fastest time sash

    The Ken Ross collection comprises 11 medals, 9 sashes and 1 racing jersey which belonged to professional cyclist Ken Ross. Ross competed successfully as a road cyclist in New South Wales during the 1920s and 1930s. He was also among the few Australian cyclists competing in Europe after the First World War and was among the first English-speaking sportsmen to enter German after the conflict had ended. The collection includes medals and sashes won in Australia and Europe.

    The bicycle has played an important role in Australian life since the 1880s, both as a sport and as a means of transportation. Cycle racing was immediately popular with clubs forming in every state by the 1890s. The period after the First World War saw a great revival of competitive cycling and local and interstate competitions drew large crowds and full newspaper coverage. The few Australian cyclists who left Australia in the 1920s to compete overseas established a long tradition of professional cyclists who have achieved success at an international level.

  • Diana Boyer collection(137)

    'Regulations for all rural workers involved in the Cropping Cycle of a GMO' by Diana Boyer
    'Time Change'
    'Time Change' p.1
    'Time Change'

    The Diana Boyer collection comprises artworks, annotated sketches and other recordings of life on 'Bobbara Creek', a rural property in the Binalong district of southern NSW, between 1981 and 2007. There are twenty eight items and groups of items in the collection. All are in good condition.

    This collection records the imaginative and emotional processes by which Diana Boyer, a migrant from Argentina, settled in an Australian place. The artworks, sketchbooks and other items show Diana's engagement with the ecological particularities of the Binalong district, and with significant issues arising from the social and economic dynamics of colonial history and the present. The items record Diana's exploration of a range of topics related to her life and work on 'Bobbara Creek', including Aboriginal dispossession, the representation of rural women, the value of biological diversity, the broader implications of introducing genetically modified canola to Australia, and the possible consequences of global warming for Australian agriculture.

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