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National Museum of Australia

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Collection Explorer

4

Collections

  • Neil Jensen collection(72)

    Weight and Centre of Gravity Schedule for G-AERD, 11 April 1980
    Letter from Percival Aircraft Co. to Mons. F. Dufaux
    Approved Certificate / Advice Note from British Aerospace re dispatch of spare parts
    Certificate of Airworthiness for aircraft HB-OFU in Great Britain and Northern Ireland, 1937

    The Neil Jensen collection consists of a Percival Gull Six aircraft, G-AERD, and associated archive. Made by the Percival Aircraft Company at Gravesend in Kent, England, in 1936, this aircraft was first purchased by Ariane Dufaux of Switzerland and registered as HB-OFU. After passing through several owners in Switzerland, the aircraft was sold to a collector and restored by Cliff Lovell in England where it was featured on the air show circuit and registered as G-AERD. Neil Jensen purchased G-AERD in 1983, and while it was based in Redhill, Surrey it was awarded the Percival Trophy by the Cotswold Aircraft Restoration Group.

    Born in Albury, New South Wales, in 1897, Edgar Wikner Percival served in Europe and Egypt with the Royal Flying Corps during the First World War. Returning to Australia after the war, Percival operated a commercial aviation business while pursuing opportunities to design and manufacture new types of aircraft. In 1929, he travelled to England to work as a test pilot for the Bristol Aircraft Company, and in 1930 designed and manufactured the first low-wing cantilever monoplanes in the British Commonwealth. Percival formed the Percival Aircraft Company in 1932 and named the new aircraft series 'Gull'. Characterised by their graceful lines, the Gulls had light wooden frames covered with doped (lacquered) fabric and powerful four or six cylinder engines. Percival's Gulls quickly established a reputation for high performance, with Percival designing racing versions named 'Mew Gulls', which won acclaim in the Kings Cup Air Race.

  • Springfield - Faithfull Family collection(3501)

    Group of people sitting on the verandah of the Bluestone Cottage at Springfield
    Loch Scaraig Skye
    Hope Faithfull with a bicycle, Lilian Faithfull seated side-saddle on a pale coloured horse and Clare Faithfull seated side-saddle on a dark coloured horse
    Card with sketch of gum nuts

    The Springfield Collection comprises about 1550 artefacts from Springfield station, south of Goulburn. It includes colonial era costume, a bushranger medal, surveying instruments, a late-19th century landau, firearms and edged weapons, wool samples and Joseph Foveaux's pocket watch and bible. The objects are complemented by over 400 photographs. This diverse collection reflects the growth and economic success of the property, responses to changes in the wool market and the daily lives of the people who have lived on Springfield.

    Springfield has grown from a 518-hectare land grant given to William Pitt Faithfull in 1828 to the current 3183 hectares with ownership remaining in the one family. William Pitt Faithfull established the Springfield Merino Stud in 1838 with ten rams selected from the Macarthur Camden Park stud. The stud evolved slowly over the years until the early 1950s when, under the management of Jim Maple-Brown, a scientific approach to wool-growing was adopted and the stud's name was changed to Fonthill to reflect this.

  • Josef Lebovic Gallery collection no. 1(7551)

    Bloom Mill (Rolling Steel)
    Brick building, with large doors and a barred door and window
    Piccadilly from Carminow, Mt Lofty, SA
    Christmas greetings.  The Bridge, Mosman's Bay, Sydney
  • Timothy Millett collection(313)

    Convict love token from H. Saunders, 1827
    Convict love token from T. Rea, 1829
    Convict love token from D. Frazier, 1835
    Convict love token from I. Worner

    The Timothy Millett collection comprises 307 convict love tokens dating from 1762 to 1856, and seven contemporary documents relating to the criminal justice system including: recommendations to commute the death sentences of Hester Sampson and Thomas Hayes to life transportation; a calendar of prisoners awaiting trial in the goals of Durham, Newcastle and Northumberland; a request to the Middlesex assizes for rewards to be paid; a printed copy of George Skene's last speech prior to execution; a printed broadside listing prisoners in Dorchester jail awaiting transportation; and a 60 page handwritten account of the life of Thomas Jones, who was transported twice and finally hanged at Winchester Prison in 1856.

    Convict love tokens, typically made from smoothed-down coins and engraved or stippled with a message, derive from traditional sailors' farewells. The production of these 'leaden hearts' rose as criminal indictments increased in Britain, with the majority produced during the 1820s and 1830s. As mementos made by or for convicts facing transportation (or death) to leave behind for their loved ones, the tokens provide a poignant, personal insight into the transportation system.

  • American-Australian Scientific Expedition to Arnhem Land (AASEAL) collection(218)

    The Moon-Man depicted on paper, Alinda, Yirrkala, 1948
    Weapon - Spear
    Bark painting divided into square and rectangular panels and depicting a rectangular figure with two triangular prongs on the top
    Malay Prau
  • Joan Richmond collection(50)

    Second of a set of three postcards from Joan Richmond - England
    Letter from Joan Richmond - Montelimar
    Driving goggles and tin belonging to Joan Richmond
    Letter and envelope from Joan Richmond - London

    The Joan Richmond collection consists of items related to the motor racing career of Joan Richmond. These include a racing suit, goggles, a trophy, number plates, a personal journal, letters, photographs and newspaper clippings.

    Joan Richmond (1905-1999) was a successful racing car driver at a time when women racing drivers were not only a rarity, but competed in the same events as men. Richmond's first major event was the 1931 Australian Grand Prix at Phillip Island in which she drove a Riley and placed a creditable fifth. Shortly after, Richmond and four friends embarked on an overland journey from Australia to Europe in order to compete in the Monte Carlo rally. This journey is credited as the first international overland tour to have originated from Australia. Following the group's successful completion of the rally, Victor Riley offerd to sponsor Richmond and in 1932, she supported the English racing car driver, Elsie Wisdom, to win the 1000 Mile Race at Brooklands. Throughout the 1930s, Richmond stayed in England and competed in more motor racing events, including several Monte Carlo rallies and the Le Mans 24 Hour race. She returned to Australia in the 1940s but was unable to continue her motor racing career due to a lack of money and sponsorship. Joan Richmond died in Melbourne in 1999.

  • Dr Helen M Wurm collection no. 4(75)

    Painting is divided into several panels and depicts several creatures, men and tools
    Bark painting depicting yams, decorated with dots, in centre with six birds
    Bark painting 'The Eagle Hawk Men, Garagan and Gulmadja, and the Flying Fox Girls' by Mungurrawuy Yunapingu, Yirrkala, 1967
    The Djang'kawl in Rirratjingu Mada Country
  • Eric J Treloar collection(56)

    Training agreement between W H Treloar and The British and Colonial Aeroplane Company Limited, 1914
    Receipt for one pound, one shilling from the Royal Aero Club of the United Kingdom, 1914
    Receipt for 50 pounds from Bleriot Aeronautics
    Receipt for 75 pounds from the British and Colonial Aeroplane Company

    The collection consists of 56 items related to the career and interests of William Harold Treloar, including photographs, magazines, newspaper clippings, documents and a cartoon by Tom Shield. The material was donated his son Eric J Treloar, and is drawn from Harold Treloar's employment and flight training before the First World War, and his commercial flying activities in Australia after the war.

    Born in Hamilton, Victoria in 1889, Harold Treloar was employed as a driver for Young Bros Auctioneers in Horsham from 1908, and then a motor mechanic and driver at McDonald's Garage in Hamilton from 1911. During 1912-13, Treloar was employed as a mechanic and driver at the Ballarat Motor Works. Treloar developed an interest in aviation and travelled to England where he was accepted as a pupil at the British and Colonial Aeroplane Company Limited in June 1914 for training in piloting and maintenance of aircraft. Treloar continued his training at the Point Cook aviation school after enlisting with the Australian Imperial Force (AIF) in 1914, and began service with the Australian Flying Corps (AFC) in 1915. Treloar was one of the first members of the AFC to enter war service as part of the 'Half Flight' sent to assist the Indian Government against Turkish forces in April 1915. In August 1915, Treloar was reported missing and then confirmed a prisoner of war, remaining in captivity until November 1918. After returning to Australia, Treloar explored a number of commercial aviation interests, entering aerial races and offering joy flights during tours of Victoria and parts of New South Wales. He was employed as an aviation officer for the British Imperial Oil Company Ltd in Adelaide, a subsidiary of the Shell Transport and Trading Company (becoming the Shell Company of Australia Ltd in 1927), from 1920 to 1940.

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